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VRTU > SEC Filings for VRTU > Form 10-K on 23-May-2014All Recent SEC Filings

Show all filings for VIRTUSA CORP

Form 10-K for VIRTUSA CORP


23-May-2014

Annual Report


Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of our operations should be read together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes to consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The following discussion contains forward-looking


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statements. Actual results may differ significantly from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause future results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those discussed in "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in this Annual Report.

Business overview

We are a global information technology services company. We use an offshore delivery model to provide a broad range of IT services, including IT consulting, technology implementation and application outsourcing. Using our enhanced global delivery model, innovative platforming approach and industry expertise, we provide cost-effective services that enable our clients to use IT to enhance business performance, accelerate time-to-market, increase productivity and improve customer service. Headquartered in Massachusetts, we have offices in the United States, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Germany and Austria, and global delivery centers in India, Sri Lanka, Hungary, Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines, as well as a near shore center in the United States. At March 31, 2014, we had 8,054 employees, or team members, an increase from 6,911 at March 31, 2013. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we had revenue of $396.9 million and income from operations of $42.4 million. In our fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, our revenue increased by $63.7 million, or 19%, to $396.9 million, as compared to $333.2 million in our fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. Our net income increased from $28.4 million in our fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 to $34.4 million in our fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

The key drivers of the increase in revenue in our fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, as compared to our fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, were as follows:


Broad based revenue growth among our clients existing at March 31, 2013, particularly our non- top ten clients collectively


Broad based revenue growth within our banking financial services and insurance ("BFSI") and communication and technology ("C&T") industry groups


Broad based growth in all geographies, led by North America and Europe

The key drivers of our increase in net income in our fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, as compared to our fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, were as follows:


Higher revenue contribution from existing clients


Increase in gross profit, which also reflects lower costs due to the depreciation of the Indian rupee, partially offset by higher operating costs, including an increased investment in our sales and business development organization and facilities to support our growth, amortization and increased professional services related to strategic initiatives


Partially offset by increased income tax expense related to higher taxable profits

High repeat business and client concentration are common in our industry. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, 89% of our revenue was derived from clients who had been using our services for more than one year. Accordingly, our global account management and service delivery teams focus on expanding client relationships and converting new engagements to long-term relationships to generate repeat revenue and expand revenue streams from existing clients. We also have a dedicated business development team focused on generating engagements with new clients to continue to expand our client base and, over time, reduce client concentration.

For the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, we generated 56%, 58%, and 54%, respectively, of revenue from application outsourcing and 44%, 42% and 46%, respectively, of revenue from consulting services. We perform our services under both time-and-materials and fixed-price contracts.


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Revenue from fixed-price contracts was 28%, 18%, and 18% of total revenue for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The revenue earned from fixed-price contracts reflects our clients' preferences during the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012.

At March 31, 2014, we had cash and cash equivalents, short-term and long-term investments of $200.7 million as compared to $95.0 million at March 31, 2013. The increase related primarily to $86.2 million of net proceeds received from our underwritten public offering of 2,645,000 shares of our common stock on January 14, 2014 and our growth in income from operations. The increase in cash balance was also driven by improvement in days sales outstanding by 10 days.

From time to time, we have also supplemented organic revenue growth with acquisitions. These acquisitions have focused on adding domain expertise, expanding our professional services teams and expanding our client base. For instance, we acquired the business and assets of OSB Consulting LLC, a New Jersey limited liability company ("OSB") on November 1, 2013 to extend our service offerings to include a broader set of finance transformation services in the financial services and insurance domains, to existing and new clients. Additionally, on January 2, 2014, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of TradeTech Consulting Scandinavia AB and its subsidiaries ("TradeTech") to expand our position within the banking, financial services and insurance industries by increasing our asset management and treasury services domain and technology expertise, as well as expanding our global presence into the Nordics. We expect that for our long-term growth, we will continue to seek evolving market opportunities through a combination of organic growth and acquisitions.

For the fiscal year ending March 31, 2015, we expect the following factors, among others, to affect our business and our operating results:


Demand from our clients particularly for millennial and transformational solutions and outsourcing services


Foreign currency volatility


Impact of an increased effective income tax rate as a result of a higher tax rate in India and geographical mix of our profits

For the fiscal year ending March 31, 2015, we plan to:


Continue to invest in our talent base, including new onsite campus recruitment programs


Implement resource and operating optimization initiatives to continue to improve operating efficiencies


Continue our focus on client acquisition and expansion of revenue gained from existing clients, particularly our non- top ten clients


Leverage our expertise in customer experience management, business process management, user interface (UI)/user experience (UX) and SAP


Deepen our domain expertise in our service offerings related to enterprise mobile applications, social media, gamification, big data analytics and cloud computing


Invest in millennial and domain-led transformational solutions within core verticals like banking, healthcare, insurance and telecommunications


Continue to invest in new and existing offshore delivery centers and expand our near shore delivery centers


Broaden our business and IT consulting and solutions capabilities related to our service offerings


Deepen our solution and service offerings across the software development lifecycle, including application support and maintenance and independent software quality-assurance


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Pursue opportunistic acquisitions that would improve or broaden our overall service delivery capabilities, domain expertise, and / or service offerings

As an IT services company, our revenue growth has been, and will continue to be, highly dependent on our ability to attract, develop, motivate and retain skilled IT professionals. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we finished the fiscal year with a total headcount of 8,054 as compared with a total headcount of 6,911 for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. There is intense competition for IT professionals with the skills necessary to provide the type of services we offer. We closely monitor our overall attrition rates and patterns to ensure our people management strategy aligns with our growth objectives. For the last twelve months ended March 31, 2014, our voluntary attrition rate was 14.8%, while our involuntary attrition rate was 4.7%. The majority of our attrition occurs in India and Sri Lanka, and is weighted towards the more junior members of our staff. In response to higher attrition and as part of our retention strategies, we have experienced increases in compensation and benefit costs, which may continue in the future. However, we try to absorb such cost increases through price increases or cost management strategies such as managing discretionary costs, the mix of professional staff and utilization levels and achieving other operating efficiencies. If our attrition rate increases or is sustained at higher levels, our growth may slow and our cost of attracting and retaining IT professionals could increase.

We have continued to maintain a twelve quarter hedging program, which we believe has been effective since inception at reducing the impact of fluctuations in local currencies on our operating results, although there is no assurance that this hedging program will continue to be effective. These hedges may also cause us to forego benefits of a positive currency fluctuation, especially given the volatility of these currencies. In addition, to the extent that these hedges cease to qualify for hedge accounting, we may have to recognize gains or losses on the aggregate amount of hedges placed earlier than expected.

We monitor a number of operating metrics to manage and assess our earnings, including:


Days sales outstanding ("DSO") is a measure of the number of days our accounts receivable are outstanding based upon the last 90 days of revenue activity, which indicates the timeliness of our cash collection from clients and our overall credit terms to our clients. DSO was 74 days and 84 days as of March 31, 2014 and March 31, 2013, respectively. Lower DSO contributes to increases in our operating cash balances.


Realized billing rates are the rates we charge our clients for our services, which reflect the value our clients place on our services, market competition and the geographic location in which we perform our services. Our realized billing rates have marginally increased for our fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 as compared to our fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. Any increase in realized billing rates is a result of our ability to successfully preserve or increase our billing rates with existing and/or new clients.


Average cost per IT professional is the sum of team member salaries, including variable compensation, and fringe benefits, divided by the average number of IT professionals during the period. We experienced an increase in our average cost per IT professional in our fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 as compared to our fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, primarily driven by competition.


Utilization rate indicates the efficiency of our billable IT resources. Our utilization rate is defined as the number of billable hours in a given period of time divided by the total number of available hours of our IT professionals in a given period of time, excluding trainees. We track our utilization rates to measure revenue potential and gross profit margins. Management's target for the utilization rate is in the low 80% range. The utilization rate is affected by the rate of quarterly sequential revenue growth, as well as ability to staff existing IT professionals on billable engagements. In growth periods, utilization tends to rise as more resources are deployed to meet rising demand. Utilization rates above the target 85% may also indicate that there are insufficient IT professionals to staff


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existing or future engagements which may result in loss of revenue or inability to service client engagements.


Attrition rate is the ratio of terminated team members during the latest twelve months to the total number of team members at the end of such period, which measures team member turnover. Increased voluntary attrition rates result in increased hiring, training and on-boarding costs and productivity losses, which may adversely affect our revenue, gross margin and operating profit margin. Our voluntary attrition rate was 14.8%, while our involuntary attrition rate was 4.7%, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014. Our voluntary attrition rate was 13.3% for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, while our involuntary attrition rate was 3.1% for the same fiscal year.


Operating expense efficiency is a measure of operating expenses as a percentage of revenue. If we continue to successfully grow our revenue, we anticipate that operating expenses will decrease as a percentage of revenue as such expenses are absorbed across a larger revenue base. In the near term, however, any operating expense efficiency may decline if our revenue declines.


Effective tax rate is our worldwide tax expense as a percentage of our consolidated net income before tax, which measures the impact of income taxes worldwide on our operations and net income. We monitor and assess our effective tax rate to evaluate whether our tax structure is competitive as compared to our industry. Our effective tax rate was 25.1% and 20.8% for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Our effective tax rate was impacted by the mix of income by jurisdiction, availability and term of certain tax holidays and settlement of uncertain tax positions identified during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014. Increases in our effective tax rate or a high effective tax rate will also have a negative effect on our earnings in future periods.


Onsite-to-offshore mix is the measurement of hours billed by resources located offshore to hours billed by our team members onsite over a defined period. We strive to manage both fixed-price contracts and time-and-materials engagements to a targeted 25% to 75% onsite-to-offshore service delivery team mix, although such delivery mix may be impacted by several factors including our new and existing client delivery requirements as well as the impact of any acquisitions.

Sources of revenue

We generate revenue by providing IT services to our clients located primarily in North America and Europe. We have historically earned, and believe that over the next few fiscal years we will continue to earn a significant portion of our revenue from a limited number of clients. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, collectively, our five largest and ten largest clients accounted for 42% and 57% of our revenue, respectively. Our two largest clients each accounted for 13% of our revenue for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014. The loss of any one of our major clients could reduce our revenue and operating profit and harm our reputation in the industry. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, 70% of our revenue was generated in North America, 25% in Europe and 5% in rest of the world. We provide IT services on either a time-and-materials or a fixed-price basis. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, the percentage of revenue from time-and-materials and fixed-price contracts was 72% and 28%, respectively.

Revenue from services provided on a time-and-materials basis is derived from the number of billable hours in a period multiplied by the contractual rates at which we bill our clients. Revenue from services provided on a fixed-price basis is recognized as efforts are expended pursuant to the percentage-of-completion method. Revenue also includes reimbursements of travel and out-of-pocket expenses with equivalent amounts of expense recorded in costs of revenue. Most of our client contracts, including those that are on a fixed-price basis, can be terminated by our clients with or without cause on 30 to 90 days prior written notice. All fees for services provided by us through the date of cancellation are generally due and payable under the contract terms.


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Our unit pricing is driven by business need, delivery timeframes, complexity of the engagement, operating differences (such as onsite/offshore ratio), competitive environment and engagement size or volume. As a pricing strategy to encourage clients to increase the volume of services that we provide to them, we may, on occasion, offer volume discounts or longer payment terms. We manage our business carefully to protect our account margins and our overall profit margins. We find that our clients generally purchase on the basis of total value, rather than on minimum cost, considering all of the factors listed above.

While we are subject to the effects of overall market pricing pressure, we believe that there is a fairly broad range of pricing offered by different competitors for each service we provide. We believe that no one competitor, or set of competitors, sets pricing in our industry. We find that our unit pricing, as a result of our global delivery model, is generally competitive with other firms who operate with a predominately offshore operating model.

The proportion of work performed at our offshore facilities and at onsite client locations varies from period-to-period. Effort, in terms of the percentage of hours billed to clients by onsite resources, was 21% and 22% of total hours billed in each of the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively, while the revenue from resources located onsite and offshore accounted for 53% and 47% respectively in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, and 53% and 47% respectively during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. We charge higher rates and incur higher compensation costs and other expenses for work performed at client locations in the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe as compared to work performed at our global delivery centers in Asia, particularly our largest centers in India and Sri Lanka. Services performed at client locations or at our offices in the United States or the United Kingdom generate higher revenue per-capita at lower gross margins than similar services performed at our global delivery centers in Asia, particularly our largest centers in India and Sri Lanka. We manage to a targeted 25% to 75% onsite-to-offshore service delivery mix, although such delivery mix may be impacted by several factors including our new and existing client delivery requirements as well as the impact of any acquisitions.

Costs of revenue and gross profit

Costs of revenue consist principally of payroll and related fringe benefits, reimbursable and non-reimbursable costs, immigration-related expenses, fees for subcontractors working on client engagements and share-based compensation expense for IT professionals including account management personnel. Wage costs in India and Sri Lanka have historically been significantly lower than wage costs in the United States and Europe for comparably-skilled IT professionals. However, wages in India and Sri Lanka are increasing in local currency, which will result in increased costs for IT professionals, particularly project managers and other mid-level professionals. We may need to increase the levels of our team member compensation more rapidly than in the past to remain competitive without the ability to make corresponding increases to our billing rates. Compensation increases may reduce our profit margins, make us less competitive in pricing potential projects against those companies with lower cost resources and otherwise harm our business, operating results and financial condition. We deploy a campus hiring philosophy and encourage internal promotions to minimize the effects of wage inflation pressure and recruiting costs. Additionally, any material appreciation in the Indian rupee or Sri Lankan rupee against the U.S. dollar or U.K. pound sterling could have a material adverse impact on our cost of services.

Our revenue and gross profit are also affected by our ability to efficiently manage and utilize our IT professionals and fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. We define utilization rate as the total number of days billed in a given period divided by the total available days of our IT professionals during that same period, excluding trainees. We manage employee utilization by continually monitoring project requirements and timetables to efficiently staff our projects and meet our clients' needs. The number of IT professionals assigned to a project will vary according to the size, complexity, duration and demands of the project. An unanticipated termination or reduction of a significant project could cause us to experience a higher than expected number of unassigned IT professionals, thereby lowering our utilization rate.


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Although, we have adopted a twelve quarter cash flow hedging program to minimize the effect of the Indian rupee movement on our financial condition, particularly our costs of revenue, these hedges may not be effective or may cause us to forego benefits, especially given the volatility of these currencies. In addition, to the extent that these hedges do not qualify for hedge accounting, we may have to recognize gains or losses on the aggregate amount of hedges remaining outstanding as of the balance sheet date.

Operating expenses

Operating expenses consist primarily of payroll and related fringe benefits, commissions, selling, share-based compensation and non-reimbursable costs, as well as promotion, communications, management, finance, administrative, occupancy, marketing and depreciation and amortization expenses. In the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014, 2013, and 2012, we invested in all aspects of our business, including sales, marketing, IT infrastructure, facilities, human resources programs and financial operations. Additionally, any material appreciation in the Indian rupee or Sri Lankan rupee against the U.S. dollar or U.K. pound sterling could have a material adverse impact on our cost of operating expenses.

Other income (expense)

Other income (expense) includes interest income, interest expense, investment gains and losses, foreign currency transaction gains and losses and disposal of fixed assets. We generate interest income by investing in time deposits, money market instruments, short-term investments and long-term investments. The functional currencies of our subsidiaries are their local currencies, except for Hungary which operates in the euro zone. Foreign currency gains and losses are generated primarily by fluctuations of the Indian rupee, Sri Lankan rupee, euro and U.K. pound sterling against the U.S. dollar on intercompany transactions. We place our cash in liquid investments at highly-rated financial institutions based on our investment policy approved by our audit committee and board of directors. We believe that our credit policies reflect normal industry terms and business risk.

Income tax expense

Our net income is subject to income tax in those countries in which we perform services and have operations, including the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, India, Sri Lanka, Germany, Singapore, Austria, Hungary, Malaysia, the Philippines and Sweden. In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, our effective tax rate was impacted by the mix of income by jurisdiction, availability and term of certain tax holidays and settlement of uncertain tax positions identified during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014. Historically, we have benefited from long-term income tax holiday arrangements in both India and Sri Lanka that are offered to certain export-oriented IT services firms. As a result of these tax holiday arrangements, our worldwide profit has been subject to a relatively low effective tax rate as compared to the statutory rates in the countries in which we operate. The effect of the income tax holidays in India and Sri Lanka decreased our income tax expense in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 by $4.5 million and $5.6 million, respectively. However, our tax expense increased by $4.1 million in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 compared to our tax expense for our fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 due to the increase in income from operations, partial expiration of special economic zone ("SEZ") holiday benefits partially offset by the successful settlement of a competent authority claim with the U.K. Increases in our effective tax rate, or a high effective tax rate, has a negative effect on our earnings in future periods.

Our effective tax rate was 25.1% and 20.8% for each of the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 respectively. Our effective tax rate in future periods will be affected by the geographic distribution of our earnings, as well as the availability of tax holidays in India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and the Philippines. We expect our effective tax rate to increase as a result of a higher tax rate in India and geographical mix of our profits.


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Application of critical accounting estimates and risks

Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles, or U.S. GAAP. Preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of revenue and expenses, assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We consider an accounting estimate to be critical to the preparation of our consolidated financial statements when both of the following are present:


the estimate is complex in nature or requires a high degree of judgment; and


the use of different estimates and assumptions could have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements.

We have discussed the development and selection of our critical accounting estimates and related disclosures with the audit committee of our board of directors. Those estimates critical to the preparation of our consolidated financial statements are listed below.

Revenue recognition

Our revenue is derived from a variety of IT consulting, technology implementation and application outsourcing services. Our services are performed under both time-and-material and fixed-price arrangements. All revenue is recognized pursuant to U.S. GAAP. Revenue is recognized as work is performed and amounts are earned. We consider amounts to be earned once evidence of an arrangement has been obtained, services are delivered, fees are fixed or determinable and collectability is reasonably assured. For contracts with fees billed on a time-and-materials basis, we generally recognize revenue as the service is performed.

Fixed-price engagements are accounted for under the percentage-of-completion method. Under the percentage-of-completion method, we estimate the percentage-of-completion based upon efforts incurred to date to the estimated total efforts required to complete each engagement. The use of the percentage-of-completion method requires significant judgment relative to . . .

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