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BMR > SEC Filings for BMR > Form 10-K on 10-Feb-2014All Recent SEC Filings

Show all filings for BIOMED REALTY TRUST INC

Form 10-K for BIOMED REALTY TRUST INC


10-Feb-2014

Annual Report


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this report. We make statements in this section that are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. For a complete discussion of forward-looking statements, see the section above entitled "Item 1. Business - Forward-Looking Statements." Certain risk factors may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from


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those expressed or implied by the following discussion. For a discussion of such risk factors, see the section above entitled "Item 1A. Risk Factors." Overview
As used herein, the terms "we," "us," "our" or the "Company" refer to BioMed Realty Trust, Inc., a Maryland corporation, and any of our subsidiaries, including BioMed Realty, L.P., a Maryland limited partnership of which BioMed Realty Trust, Inc. is the parent company and general partner, which may be referred to herein as the "operating partnership." BioMed Realty Trust, Inc. conducts its business and owns its assets through the operating partnership and operates as a fully integrated, self-administered and self-managed REIT. The operating partnership is focused on acquiring, developing, owning, leasing and managing laboratory and office space for the life science industry. Our tenants primarily include biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, scientific research institutions, government agencies and other entities involved in the life science industry. Our properties are generally located in markets with well-established reputations as centers for scientific research, including Boston, San Francisco, San Diego, Maryland, North Carolina, New York/New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Seattle and Cambridge (United Kingdom).
We were formed on April 30, 2004 and completed BioMed Realty Trust, Inc.'s initial public offering on August 11, 2004.
At December 31, 2013, we owned or had interests in a portfolio of properties with an aggregate of approximately 16.3 million rentable square feet.

                                                                                           Weighted-
                                            Gross                          Rentable         Average
                                          Book Value        Buildings     Square Feet    Leased % (1)
                                        (In thousands)
Stabilized                            $      4,116,424           115       9,544,945            99.1 %
Lease up                                     1,447,689            60       5,554,641            69.6 %
Total operating portfolio                    5,564,113           175      15,099,586            91.4 %

Development                                     95,479             4         694,305            59.2 %
Redevelopment                                   31,944             2         146,000            97.6 %
Unconsolidated partnership portfolio            32,069             3         355,080            77.3 %
Pre-development                                106,999             -       1,057,000               -
Development potential                          204,945             -       3,866,000               -
Total portfolio                       $      6,035,549           184      21,217,971

(1) Calculated based on gross book value for each asset multiplied by the percentage leased.

Factors Which May Influence Future Operations Our long-term corporate strategy is to continue to focus on acquiring, developing, owning, leasing and managing laboratory and office space for the life science industry. As of December 31, 2013, our total operating portfolio was 91.4% leased on a weighted-average basis to 296 tenants. As of December 31, 2012, our total operating portfolio was 92.1% leased on a weighted-average basis to 209 tenants. The decrease in our total operating portfolio leased percentage and increase in number of tenants were primarily due to our acquisitions completed in 2013, which were 83.5% leased on a weighted-average basis at acquisition.
Our leasing strategy for 2014 focuses on leasing vacant space, negotiating renewals for leases scheduled to expire during the year, and identifying new tenants or existing tenants seeking additional space to occupy the spaces for which we are unable to negotiate such renewals. We may proceed with additional new developments and acquisitions, as real estate and capital market conditions permit. As of December 31, 2013, leases representing 5.7% of our leased square feet were scheduled to expire during 2014. The success of our leasing and development strategy depends on, among other things, general economic conditions, real estate market conditions and life science industry trends in our target markets in the United States and the United Kingdom.
As a result of changing market conditions and the recent economic recession, we believe that the fair-values of some of our properties may have declined below their respective carrying values. However, to the extent that a property has a substantial remaining estimated useful life and management does not believe that the property will be disposed of prior to the end of its useful life, it would be unusual for undiscounted cash flows to be insufficient to recover the property's carrying value. We presently have the ability and intent to continue to own and operate our existing portfolio of properties and estimated undiscounted future cash flows from the operation of the properties are expected to be sufficient to recover the carrying value of each property. Accordingly,


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we do not believe that the carrying value of any of our properties is impaired. If our ability and/or our intent with regard to the operation of our properties otherwise dictate an earlier sale date, an impairment loss may be recognized to reduce the property to fair-value and such loss could be material. Lease Expirations
The following is a summary of lease expirations over the next ten calendar years for leases in place at December 31, 2013. This table assumes that none of the tenants exercise renewal options or early termination rights, if any, at or prior to the scheduled expirations:

                                                                                                  Current
                                                                                 Percent of      Annualized
                                              Percent of         Current           Current       Base Rent
                                Leased          Leased          Annualized       Annualized      per Leased
Year of Lease Expiration      Square Feet    Square Feet        Base Rent         Base Rent     Square Feet
                                                              (In thousands)
Month-to-month                    10,080            0.1 %   $            300           0.1 %   $      29.76
2014                             815,540            5.7 %             27,453           5.4 %          33.66
2015                             661,717            4.6 %             20,243           3.9 %          30.59
2016                           1,176,148            8.2 %             45,268           8.8 %          38.49
2017                             649,002            4.5 %             19,245           3.7 %          29.65
2018                           1,827,585           12.8 %             81,440          15.7 %          44.56
2019                             944,668            6.6 %             27,870           5.4 %          29.50
2020                             879,603            6.1 %             30,436           5.9 %          34.60
2021                             638,284            4.5 %             19,352           3.7 %          30.32
2022                             785,347            5.5 %             18,691           3.6 %          23.80
2023                           1,117,505            7.8 %             55,152          10.7 %          49.35
Thereafter                     4,814,723           33.6 %            171,770          33.1 %          35.68
Total Portfolio /
Weighted-Average              14,320,202          100.0 %   $        517,220         100.0 %   $      36.12

The success of our leasing and development strategy will be dependent upon the general economic conditions and more specifically real estate market conditions and life science industry trends in the United States and in our target markets of Boston, San Francisco, San Diego, Maryland, North Carolina, New York/New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Seattle, Cambridge (United Kingdom) and research parks near or adjacent to universities. We cannot give any assurance that leases will be renewed or that available space will be released at rental rates equal to or above the current contractual rental rates or at all.

Critical Accounting Policies
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) requires management to use judgment in the application of accounting policies, including making estimates and assumptions. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. These judgments affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. If our judgment or interpretation of the facts and circumstances relating to various transactions had been different, it is possible that different accounting policies would have been applied resulting in a different presentation of our financial statements. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates and assumptions. In the event estimates or assumptions prove to be different from actual results, adjustments are made in subsequent periods to reflect more current information. Below is a discussion of accounting policies that we consider critical in that they address the most material parts of our financial statements, require complex judgment in their application or require estimates about matters that are inherently uncertain.
Revenue Recognition, Operating Expenses and Lease Terminations We commence revenue recognition on our leases based on a number of factors. In most cases, revenue recognition under a lease begins when the lessee takes possession of or controls the physical use of the leased asset. Generally, this occurs on the lease commencement date. In determining what constitutes the leased asset, we evaluate whether we or the lessee is the owner, for accounting purposes, of the tenant improvements. If we are the owner, for accounting purposes, of the tenant improvements, then


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the leased asset is the finished space and revenue recognition begins when the lessee takes possession of the finished space, typically when the improvements are substantially complete. If we conclude that we are not the owner, for accounting purposes, of the tenant improvements (the lessee is the owner), then the leased asset is the unimproved space and any tenant improvement allowances funded under the lease are treated as lease incentives, which reduce revenue recognized on a straight-line basis over the remaining non-cancelable term of the respective lease. In these circumstances, we begin revenue recognition when the lessee takes possession of the unimproved space for the lessee to construct improvements. The determination of who is the owner, for accounting purposes, of the tenant improvements determines the nature of the leased asset and when revenue recognition under a lease begins. We consider a number of different factors to evaluate whether we or the lessee is the owner of the tenant improvements for accounting purposes. These factors include:
whether the lease stipulates how and on what a tenant improvement allowance may be spent;

whether the tenant or landlord retain legal title to the improvements;

the uniqueness of the improvements;

the expected economic life of the tenant improvements relative to the length of the lease;

the responsible party for construction cost overruns; and

who constructs or directs the construction of the improvements.

The determination of who owns the tenant improvements, for accounting purposes, is subject to significant judgment. In making that determination we consider all of the above factors. However, no one factor is determinative in reaching a conclusion.
All leases are classified as operating leases and minimum rents are recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the related lease. The excess of rents recognized over amounts contractually due pursuant to the underlying leases is included in accrued straight-line rents on the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and contractually due but unpaid rents are included in accounts receivable. Existing leases at acquired properties are reviewed at the time of acquisition to determine if contractual rents are above or below current market rents for the acquired property. An identifiable lease intangible asset or liability is recorded based on the present value (using a discount rate that reflects the risks associated with the acquired leases) of the difference between (1) the contractual amounts to be paid pursuant to the in-place leases and (2) our estimate of the fair market lease rates for the corresponding in-place leases at acquisition, measured over a period equal to the remaining non-cancelable term of the leases and any fixed rate renewal periods. The capitalized above-market lease values are amortized as a reduction of rental income over the remaining non-cancelable terms of the respective leases. The capitalized below-market lease values are amortized as an increase to rental income over the remaining non-cancelable terms of the respective leases. If a lease were to be terminated or if termination were determined to be likely (e.g., in the case of a tenant bankruptcy) prior to its contractual expiration, amortization of the related unamortized above or below market lease intangible would be accelerated and such amounts written off.
Rental operations expenses, consisting of real estate taxes, insurance and common area maintenance costs, are subject to recovery from tenants under the terms of our lease agreements. Amounts recovered are dependent on several factors, including occupancy and lease terms. Revenues are recognized in the period the expenses are incurred. The reimbursements are recorded in revenues as tenant recoveries, and the expenses are recorded in rental operations expenses, as the Company is generally the primary obligor with respect to purchasing goods and services from third-party suppliers, has discretion in selecting the supplier and bears the credit risk.
On an ongoing basis, we evaluate the recoverability of tenant balances, including rents receivable, straight-line rents receivable, tenant improvements, deferred leasing costs and any acquisition intangibles. When it is determined that the recoverability of tenant balances is not probable, an allowance for expected losses related to tenant receivables, including straight-line rents receivable is recorded as a charge to earnings. Upon the termination of a lease, the amortization of tenant improvements, deferred leasing costs and acquisition intangible assets and liabilities is accelerated to the expected termination date as a charge to their respective line items and tenant receivables are written off as a reduction of the allowance in the period in which the balance is deemed to be no longer collectible. For financial reporting purposes, a lease is treated as terminated upon a tenant filing for bankruptcy, when a space is abandoned and a tenant ceases rent payments, or when other circumstances indicate that termination of a tenant's lease is probable (e.g., eviction). Lease termination fees are recognized in other revenue when the related leases are canceled, the amounts to be received are fixed and determinable and collectability is assured, and when we have no continuing obligation to provide services to such former tenants.
Investments in Partnerships and Limited Liability Companies


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We evaluate our investments in limited liability companies and partnerships to determine whether such entities may be a variable interest entity, or VIE, and, if a VIE, whether we are the primary beneficiary. Generally, an entity is determined to be a VIE when either (1) the equity investors (if any) lack one or more of the essential characteristics of a controlling financial interest, (2) the equity investment at risk is insufficient to finance that entity's activities without additional subordinated financial support or (3) the equity investors have voting rights that are not proportionate to their economic interests and the activities of the entity involve or are conducted on behalf of an investor with a disproportionately small voting interest. The primary beneficiary is the entity that has both (1) the power to direct matters that most significantly impact the VIE's economic performance and (2) the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits of the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. We consider a variety of factors in identifying the entity that holds the power to direct matters that most significantly impact the VIE's economic performance including, but not limited to, the ability to direct financing, leasing, construction and other operating decisions and activities. In addition, we consider the rights of other investors to participate in policy making decisions, to replace or remove the manager of the entity and to liquidate or sell the entity. The obligation to absorb losses and the right to receive benefits when a reporting entity is affiliated with a VIE must be based on ownership, contractual, and/or other pecuniary interests in that VIE. We have determined that we are the primary beneficiary in five VIEs (excluding certain VIEs through our ownership of Wexford), consisting of single-tenant properties in which the tenant has a fixed-price purchase option, which are consolidated and reflected in the accompanying consolidated financial statements.
If the above conditions do not apply, we consider whether a general partner or managing member controls a limited partnership or limited liability company, respectively. The general partner in a limited partnership or managing member in a limited liability company is presumed to control that limited partnership or limited liability company, as applicable. The presumption may be overcome if the limited partners or members have either (1) the substantive ability to dissolve the limited partnership or limited liability company, as applicable, or otherwise remove the general partner or managing member, as applicable, without cause or (2) substantive participating rights, which provide the limited partners or members with the ability to effectively participate in significant decisions that would be expected to be made in the ordinary course of the limited partnership's or limited liability company's business, as applicable, and thereby preclude the general partner or managing member from exercising unilateral control over the partnership or limited liability company, as applicable. If these criteria are met and we are the general partner or the managing member, as applicable, the consolidation of the partnership or limited liability company is required.
Except for investments that are consolidated, we account for investments in entities over which we exercise significant influence, but do not control, under the equity method of accounting. These investments are recorded initially at cost and subsequently adjusted for equity in earnings and cash contributions and distributions. Under the equity method of accounting, our net equity in the investment is reflected in the consolidated balance sheets and its share of net income or loss is included in our consolidated statements of income. On a periodic basis, management assesses whether there are any indicators that the carrying value of our investments in unconsolidated partnerships or limited liability companies may be impaired on a more than temporary basis. An investment is impaired only if management's estimate of the fair-value of the investment is less than the carrying value of the investment on a more than temporary basis. To the extent impairment has occurred, the loss is measured as the excess of the carrying value of the investment over the fair-value of the investment. Management does not believe that the value of any of our unconsolidated investments in partnerships or limited liability companies was impaired as of December 31, 2013.
We are also a party to certain VIEs through our ownership of Wexford, which are described in further detail in Note 11 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere herein.
Impairment of Investments in Real Estate When circumstances such as adverse market conditions indicate a possible impairment of the value of a property, we review the recoverability of the property's carrying value. The review of recoverability is based on an estimate of the future undiscounted cash flows (excluding interest charges) expected to result from the long-lived asset's use and eventual disposition. These cash flows consider factors such as expected future operating income, trends and prospects, as well as the effects of leasing demand, competition and other factors. If impairment exists due to the inability to recover the carrying value of a long-lived asset, an impairment loss is recorded to the extent that the carrying value exceeds the estimated fair-value of the property. We are required to make subjective assessments as to whether there are impairments in the values of our investments in long-lived assets. These assessments have a direct impact on our net income because recording an impairment loss results in an immediate negative adjustment to net income. The evaluation of anticipated cash flows is highly subjective and is based in part on assumptions regarding future occupancy, rental rates and capital requirements that could differ materially from actual results in future periods. Although our strategy is to hold our properties over the long-term, if our strategy changes or market conditions otherwise dictate an earlier sale date, an impairment loss may be recognized to reduce the property to fair-value and such loss could be material. If we determine that impairment has occurred, the affected assets must be reduced to their fair-value.


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Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair-Value We measure financial instruments and other items at fair-value where required under GAAP, but have elected not to measure any additional financial instruments and other items at fair-value as permitted under fair-value option accounting guidance.
Fair-value measurement is determined based on the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. As a basis for considering market participant assumptions in fair-value measurements, there is a fair-value hierarchy that distinguishes between market participant assumptions based on market data obtained from sources independent of the reporting entity
(observable inputs that are classified within Levels 1 and 2 of the hierarchy)
and the reporting entity's own assumptions about market participant assumptions (unobservable inputs classified within Level 3 of the hierarchy). Level 1 inputs utilize quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that we have the ability to access. Level 2 inputs are inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 2 inputs may include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, as well as inputs that are observable for the asset or liability (other than quoted prices), such as interest rates, foreign exchange rates, and yield curves that are observable at commonly quoted intervals. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability, which are typically based on an entity's own assumptions, as there is little, if any, related market activity. In instances where the determination of the fair-value measurement is based on inputs from different levels of the fair-value hierarchy, the level in the fair-value hierarchy within which the entire fair-value measurement falls is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair-value measurement in its entirety. Our assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair-value measurement in its entirety requires judgment, and considers factors specific to the asset or liability.
We have used interest rate swaps to manage our interest rate risk. The valuation of these instruments is determined using widely accepted valuation techniques including discounted cash flow analysis on the expected cash flows of each derivative. This analysis reflects the contractual terms of the derivatives, including the period to maturity, and uses observable market-based inputs, including interest rate curves. The fair-values of interest rate swaps are determined using the market standard methodology of netting the discounted future fixed cash receipts (or payments) and the discounted expected variable cash payments (or receipts). The variable cash payments (or receipts) are based on an expectation of future interest rates (forward curves) derived from observable market interest rate curves. We incorporate credit valuation adjustments to appropriately reflect both our own nonperformance risk and the respective counterparty's nonperformance risk in the fair-value measurements. In adjusting the fair-value of our derivative contracts for the effect of nonperformance risk, we have considered the impact of netting and any applicable credit enhancements, such as collateral postings, thresholds, mutual puts, and guarantees.
Derivative Instruments
We record all derivatives on the consolidated balance sheets at fair-value. In determining the fair-value of our derivatives, we consider our credit risk and that of our counterparties. These counterparties are generally larger financial institutions engaged in providing a variety of financial services. These institutions generally face similar risks regarding adverse changes in market and economic conditions, including, but not limited to, fluctuations in interest rates, exchange rates, equity and commodity prices and credit spreads. The ongoing disruptions in the financial markets have heightened the risks to these institutions. While management believes that our counterparties will meet their obligations under the derivative contracts, it is possible that defaults may occur.
The accounting for changes in the fair-value of derivatives depends on the intended use of the derivative, whether we have elected to designate a derivative in a hedging relationship and apply hedge accounting and whether the hedging relationship has satisfied the criteria necessary to apply hedge accounting. Derivatives designated and qualifying as a hedge of the exposure to changes in the fair-value of an asset, liability, or firm commitment attributable to a particular risk, such as interest rate risk, are considered fair-value hedges. Derivatives designated and qualifying as a hedge of the exposure to variability in expected future cash flows, or other types of forecasted transactions, are considered cash flow hedges. Derivatives may also be designated as hedges of the foreign currency exposure of a net investment in a foreign operation. Hedge accounting generally provides for the matching of the timing of gain or loss recognition on the hedging instrument with the . . .

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