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MOV > SEC Filings for MOV > Form 10-K on 26-Mar-2013All Recent SEC Filings

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Form 10-K for MOVADO GROUP INC


26-Mar-2013

Annual Report


Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

GENERAL

Net Sales. The Company operates and manages its business in two principal business segments - Wholesale and Retail. The Company also operates in two geographic locations - United States and International. The Company divides its watch brands into three distinct categories: luxury, accessible luxury and licensed brands. The luxury category consists of the Ebel and Concord brands. The accessible luxury category consists of the Movado and ESQ Movado brands. The licensed brands category represents brands distributed under license agreements and includes Coach, HUGO BOSS, Juicy Couture, Lacoste, Tommy Hilfiger and beginning in the first quarter of fiscal 2014, certain trademarks owned by Ferrari S.p.A.

The primary factors that influence annual sales are general economic conditions in the Company's U.S. and international markets, new product introductions, the level and effectiveness of advertising and marketing expenditures and product pricing decisions.

Approximately 50% of the Company's total sales are from international markets (see Note 14 to the Consolidated Financial Statements), and therefore reported sales made in those markets are affected by foreign exchange rates. The Company's international sales are primarily billed in local currencies (predominantly Euros and Swiss francs) and translated to U.S. dollars at average exchange rates for financial reporting purposes.

The Company's business is seasonal. There are two major selling seasons in the Company's markets: the spring season, which includes school graduations and several holidays and, most importantly, the Christmas and holiday season. Major selling seasons in certain international markets center on significant local holidays that occur in late winter or early spring. The Company's net sales historically have been higher during the second half of the fiscal year. The second half of each year accounted for 56.1%, 56.6%, and 58.6% of the Company's net sales for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

The Company's retail operations consist of 34 outlet stores located throughout the United States and, until February 14, 2012, also included the Movado brand flagship store located at Rockefeller Center in New York City which was closed on that date, as the Company did not renew its lease.

The significant factors that influence annual sales volumes in the Company's retail operations are similar to those that influence U.S. wholesale sales. In addition, most of the Company's outlet stores are located near vacation destinations and, therefore, the seasonality of these stores is driven by the peak tourist seasons associated with these locations.


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Gross Margins. The Company's overall gross margins are primarily affected by four major factors: brand and product sales mix, product pricing strategy, manufacturing costs and fluctuation in foreign currency exchange rates, in particular the relationship between the U.S. dollar and the Swiss franc and the Euro. Gross margins for the Company may not be comparable to those of other companies, since some companies include all the costs related to their distribution networks in cost of sales whereas the Company does not include the costs associated with its U.S. and Asia warehousing and distribution facilities nor the occupancy costs for the retail segment in the cost of sales line item.

Gross margins vary among the brands included in the Company's portfolio and also among watch models within each brand. Watches in the luxury category generally earn lower gross margin percentages than watches in the accessible luxury category. Gross margins in the Company's outlet business have historically been lower than those in the wholesale business since the outlets primarily sell seconds and discontinued models that generally command lower selling prices. In the current fiscal year, gross margins for the outlet business were in line with that of the wholesale business as the segment was less promotional year-over-year.

All of the Company's brands compete with a number of other brands on the basis of not only styling but also wholesale and retail price. The Company's ability to improve margins through price increases is therefore, to some extent, constrained by competitors' actions.

Cost of sales of the Company's products consists primarily of component costs, royalties, assembly costs, depreciation, amortization and unit overhead costs associated with the Company's supply chain operations in Switzerland and Asia. The Company's supply chain operations consist of logistics management of assembly operations and product sourcing in Switzerland and Asia and minor assembly in Switzerland. Through productivity improvement efforts, the Company has controlled the level of overhead costs and maintained flexibility in its cost structure by outsourcing a significant portion of its component and assembly requirements.

Cost of sales of the Company's products includes costs for raw material and components, as well as labor for assembly of finished goods, all of which can be impacted by inflation. While inflation in costs has negatively impacted gross margin percentage, this effect has not been material to the Company's results of operations for the periods presented in this report. A significant increase in these costs due to inflation could have a material adverse effect on the Company's future results of operations. While the Company may seek to offset the negative inflationary impact on these costs with price increases on its products, its ability to effectively do so will depend on the extent it can pass on price increases and still remain competitive in the marketplace.

Effective February 1, 2011, the Company changed its method of valuing its U.S. inventories to the average cost method. In prior years, primarily all U.S. inventories were valued using the first-in, first-out ("FIFO") method. With this change, all of the Company's inventories are now valued using the average cost method. The comparative consolidated financial statements of prior periods presented have been adjusted to apply the accounting method retroactively. For more information regarding these inventory related charges, see Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates - Inventories.

In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, the Company recorded a sale of certain mechanical movements that had been written down in the previous year. As a result, the Company recorded a pre-tax net profit of $2.3 million related to those movements. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, the Company recorded a non-cash charge of $24.1 million to write-down certain inventories to market value, primarily inventories of certain non-core gold watches and related parts and mechanical movements. For more


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information regarding these inventory related charges, see "Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates - Inventories."

Since a substantial amount of the Company's product costs are incurred in Swiss francs, fluctuations in the U.S. dollar/Swiss franc exchange rate can impact the Company's cost of goods sold and, therefore, its gross margins. The Company reduces its exposure to the Swiss franc exchange rate risk through a hedging program. Under the hedging program, the Company manages most of its foreign currency exposures on a consolidated basis, which allows it to net certain exposures and take advantage of natural offsets. In the event these exposures do not offset, the Company has the ability to hedge its Swiss franc purchases using a combination of forward contracts and purchased currency options. The Company's hedging program had the effect of reducing the exchange rate impact on product costs and gross margins for fiscal years 2013, 2012 and 2011.

Selling, General and Administrative ("SG&A") Expenses. The Company's SG&A expenses consist primarily of marketing, selling, distribution, general and administrative expenses. In fiscal 2013 and 2012, the Company recorded a $3.0 million pre-tax charge related to donations made to the Movado Group Foundation. In fiscal 2011, the Company recorded a non-cash pre-tax charge of $3.1 million related to the write-down of certain assets related to intangible assets, tooling costs and trade booths for the Basel Fair. In fiscal 2011, the Company also recorded a benefit of $4.3 million resulting from the reversal of a previously recorded liability for a retirement agreement with the Company's former Chairman.

Annual marketing expenditures are based principally on overall strategic considerations relative to maintaining or increasing market share in markets that management considers to be crucial to the Company's continued success as well as on general economic conditions in the various markets around the world in which the Company sells its products. Marketing expenses include various forms of media advertising, digital advertising and co-operative advertising with customers and distributors and other point-of-sale marketing and promotion spending. For fiscal 2013, 2012 and 2011, the Company increased its investment in marketing and advertising in order to elevate its connection to consumers and better position its brands in the marketplace.

Selling expenses consist primarily of salaries, sales commissions, sales force travel and related expenses, depreciation and amortization, expenses associated with Baselworld, the annual watch and jewelry trade show, and other industry trade shows and operating costs incurred in connection with the Company's retail business. Sales commissions vary with overall sales levels. Retail selling expenses consist primarily of payroll related and store occupancy costs.

Distribution expenses consist primarily of salaries of distribution staff, rental and other occupancy costs, security, depreciation and amortization of furniture and leasehold improvements and shipping supplies.

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries and other employee compensation including performance based compensation, employee benefit plan costs, office rent, management information systems costs, professional fees, bad debts, depreciation and amortization of furniture, computer software and leasehold improvements, patent and trademark expenses and various other general corporate expenses.

Interest Expense. To the extent it borrows, the Company will record interest expense on its revolving credit facility. Additionally, interest expense includes the amortization of deferred financing costs associated with the Company's revolving credit facility.


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CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

The Company's consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and those significant policies are more fully described in Note 1 to the Company's consolidated financial statements. The preparation of these financial statements and the application of certain critical accounting policies require management to make judgments based on estimates and assumptions that affect the information reported. On an on-going basis, management evaluates its estimates and judgments, including those related to sales discounts and markdowns, product returns, bad debt, inventories, income taxes, warranty obligations, useful lives of property, plant and equipment, impairments, stock-based compensation and contingencies and litigation. Management bases its estimates and judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources on historical experience, contractual commitments and on various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ from these estimates. Management believes the following are the critical accounting policies requiring significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of its consolidated financial statements.

Revenue Recognition

In the wholesale segment, the Company recognizes revenue upon transfer of title and risk of loss in accordance with its FOB shipping point terms of sale and after the sales price is fixed and determinable and collectability is reasonably assured. In the retail segment, transfer of title and risk of loss occurs at the time of register receipt. The Company records estimates for sales returns and sales and cash discount allowances as a reduction of revenue in the same period that the sales are recorded. These estimates are based upon historical analysis, customer agreements and/or currently known factors that arise in the normal course of business. While returns have historically been within the Company's expectations and the provisions established, future return rates may differ from those experienced in the past. In the event that returns are authorized at a rate significantly higher than the Company's historic rate, the resulting returns could have an adverse impact on its operating results for the period in which such results materialize. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013, the Company recorded a charge of $4.9 million related to the repositioning of the Coach watch brand from a collection priced to be sold in a department store's fine watch department to one suitable for sale in the fashion watch department. The charge represents the Company's estimated cost of the aggregate sales allowance to Coach watch retailers affected by the repositioning.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

Accounts receivable are reduced by an allowance for amounts that may be uncollectible in the future. Estimates are used in determining the allowance for doubtful accounts and are based on an analysis of the aging of accounts receivable, assessments of collectability based on historic trends, the financial condition of the Company's customers and an evaluation of economic conditions. In general, the actual bad debt losses have historically been within the Company's expectations and the allowances it established. As of January 31, 2013, except for those accounts provided for in the reserve for doubtful accounts, the Company knew of no situations with any of the Company's major customers which would indicate the customer's inability to make their required payments.


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Inventories

The Company valued its inventory at the lower of cost or market. Effective February 1, 2011, the Company changed its method of valuing its U.S. inventories to the average cost method. In prior years, primarily all U.S. inventories were valued using the FIFO method. With this change, all of the Company's inventories are now valued using the average cost method. The Company believed that the average cost method of inventory valuation is preferable because (1) it permits the Company to use a single method of accounting for all of the Company's U.S. and international inventories, (2) it aligns costing with the Company's forecasting and procurement decisions, and (3) since a number of the Company's key competitors use the average cost method, it improves comparability of the Company's financial statements. The consolidated financial statements of prior periods presented have been adjusted to apply the accounting method retroactively, as described in the applicable accounting guidance for accounting changes and error corrections. The Company performed reviews of its on-hand inventory to determine amounts, if any, of inventory that is deemed discontinued, excess, or unsaleable. Inventory classified as discontinued, together with the related component parts which can be assembled into saleable finished goods, is sold primarily through the Company's outlet stores. When management determines that finished product is unsaleable or that it is impractical to build the remaining components into watches for sale, a charge is recorded to value those products and components at the lower of cost or market.

During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, the Company recorded a net pre-tax profit of $2.3 million related to the sale of certain Ebel proprietary watch movements that were previously written down in the prior year. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, there were events and circumstances, as described below, that resulted in the Company recording a non-cash charge of approximately $24.1 million to write-down certain inventories to market value, primarily inventories of certain non-core gold watches and related parts and mechanical movements. Certain watches in the Ebel brand line used proprietary watch movements that were assembled by the Company from parts purchased from third party suppliers. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, the Company performed a strategic review of the Ebel brand and concluded that the future direction for the brand would not include the production of these proprietary movements, making inventory of these movement parts excess and obsolete. As a result, the Company recorded a charge to cost of sales for the future disposition of such inventory, net of estimated recovery. Additionally, in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, the Company concluded it would significantly reduce its offering of gold watches, considering particularly the recent increases in the price of gold, and therefore recorded a charge to cost of sales related to non-core gold inventory. Ordinarily, the Company would utilize its outlet stores to dispose of this excess inventory; however, in performing a detailed review of the non-core inventory, the Company concluded that the time, effort and costs to sell most of the gold watches were excessive and that the current salvage value provided a quicker and adequate return. These gold watches and components were valued at market, which resulted in a charge to cost of sales. As of January 31, 2012, the Company substantially completed its initiative to recover gold from this non-core gold inventory.

Long-Lived Assets

The Company periodically reviews the estimated useful lives of its depreciable assets based on factors including historical experience, the expected beneficial service period of the asset, the quality and durability of the asset and the Company's maintenance policy including periodic upgrades. Changes in useful lives are made on a prospective basis unless factors indicate the carrying amounts of the assets may not be recoverable and an impairment is necessary.


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The Company performs an impairment review of its long-lived assets once events or changes in circumstances indicate, in management's judgment, that the carrying value of such assets may not be recoverable. When such a determination has been made, management compares the carrying value of the assets with their estimated future undiscounted cash flows. If it is determined that an impairment loss has occurred, the loss is recognized during that period. The impairment loss is calculated as the difference between asset carrying values and the fair value of the long-lived assets.

In the first quarter of fiscal 2011, the Company determined that the carrying value of its long-lived assets with respect to certain Movado boutiques was not recoverable. The review was performed because of the closing of the boutique division and as a result the Company recorded a non-cash pre-tax charge of $3.4 million related to the write-downs of property, plant and equipment. This charge was included in discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, the Company recorded a non-cash pre-tax charge of $3.1 million, primarily related to the write-down of certain intangible assets, tooling costs and trade booths for the Basel Fair. The review was performed because of fiscal 2011 fourth quarter losses and future forecasted losses of specific business areas. This charge was included in the selling, general and administrative expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. All of the above impairment charges were calculated as the difference between the assets' carrying values and their estimated fair value. In each case, the estimated fair value of the assets was zero as the future undiscounted cash flow was negative.

Warranties

All watches sold by the Company come with limited warranties covering the movement against defects in material and workmanship for periods ranging from two to three years from the date of purchase, with the exception of Tommy Hilfiger watches, for which the warranty period is ten years. In addition, the warranty period is five years for the gold plating on certain Movado watch cases and bracelets. The Company records an estimate for future warranty costs based on historical repair costs. Warranty costs have historically been within the Company's expectations and the provisions established. If such costs were to substantially exceed estimates, this could have an adverse effect on the Company's operating results.

Stock-Based Compensation

Under the accounting guidance for share-based payments, the Company utilizes the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to calculate the fair value of each option at the grant date which requires that certain assumptions be made. The expected life of stock option grants is determined using historical data and represents the time period during which the stock option is expected to be outstanding until it is exercised. The risk free interest rate is the yield on the grant date of U.S. Treasury constant maturities with a maturity date closest to the expected life of the stock option. The expected stock price volatility is derived from historical volatility and calculated based on the estimated term structure of the stock option grant. The expected dividend yield is calculated using the expected annualized dividend which remains constant during the expected term of the option.

Compensation expense for equity instruments is accrued based on the estimated number of instruments for which the requisite service is expected to be rendered. This estimate is reflected in the period of change. Expense related to stock option compensation is recognized on a straight-line basis over the vesting term.


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Income Taxes

The Company follows the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax laws and tax rates in each jurisdiction where the Company operates, and applied to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities due to a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. In addition, the amounts of any future tax benefits are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent such benefits are not expected to be realized on a more-likely-than-not basis. The Company calculates estimated income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which it operates. This process involves estimating actual current tax expense along with assessing temporary differences resulting from differing treatment of items for both book and tax purposes. See Note 7 to the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements for further information regarding income taxes.

The Company follows guidance for accounting for uncertainty in income taxes. This guidance clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise's financial statements and prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement standard for the financial statement recognition and measurement of an income tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. This guidance also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosures and transitions.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following is a discussion of the results of operations for fiscal 2013 compared to fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2012 compared to fiscal 2011 along with a discussion of the changes in financial condition during fiscal 2013.

The following are net sales by business segment and geographic location (in thousands):

                             Fiscal Year Ended January 31,
                     2013                2012                2011
Wholesale:
United States         $207,362            $179,699            $146,990
International          241,927             233,126             182,147
Retail                  56,189              55,292              53,053

Net sales             $505,478            $468,117            $382,190


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The following table presents the Company's results of operations expressed as a percentage of net sales for the fiscal years indicated:

                                                             Fiscal Year Ended January 31,
                                                      2013                2012                2011
                                                 % of net sales      % of net sales      % of net sales

Net sales                                            100.0%              100.0%              100.0%
Gross margin                                         55.0%               54.8%               47.9%
Selling, general and administrative expenses         45.2%               47.6%               51.1%
Operating income / (loss)                             9.8%                7.2%               (3.2)%
Other income                                          0.0%                0.2%                0.0%
Interest expense                                      0.1%                0.3%                0.6%
Interest income                                       0.1%                0.1%                0.1%
(Benefit) / provision for income taxes               (1.7)%               0.1%                2.3%
Noncontrolling interests                              0.2%                0.1%                0.2%
Income / (loss) from continuing operations,
net of tax                                           11.3%                6.8%               (6.1)%
(Loss) from discontinued operations, net of
tax                                                   0.0%                0.0%               (6.2)%
Net income / (loss) attributed to Movado
Group, Inc.                                          11.3%                6.8%              (12.3)%


Fiscal 2013 Compared to Fiscal 2012

Net Sales

Net sales in fiscal 2013 were $505.5 million, $37.4 million or 8.0% above the prior year. Net sales in fiscal 2013 included a charge of $4.9 million related to the repositioning of the Coach watch brand from a collection priced to be sold in a department store's fine watch department to one suitable for sale in the fashion watch department. The charge represents the Company's estimated cost of the aggregate sales allowance to Coach watch retailers affected by the repositioning. Net sales in fiscal 2012 included a sale of certain proprietary movements for $3.0 million. The increase in net sales was driven by growth in both the United States and international locations of the wholesale segment. For fiscal 2013, fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates unfavorably impacted net sales by $7.6 million when compared to the prior year.

United States Wholesale Net Sales

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