Search the web
Welcome, Guest
[Sign Out, My Account]
EDGAR_Online

Quotes & Info
Enter Symbol(s):
e.g. YHOO, ^DJI
Symbol Lookup | Financial Search
MVIS > SEC Filings for MVIS > Form 10-K on 14-Mar-2013All Recent SEC Filings

Show all filings for MICROVISION INC | Request a Trial to NEW EDGAR Online Pro

Form 10-K for MICROVISION INC


14-Mar-2013

Annual Report


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Overview

We are developing our proprietary PicoP® display technology, which can be used by our customers to create high-resolution miniature laser display and imaging engines. Our PicoP display technology utilizes our widely patented expertise in two dimensional Micro-Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS), lasers, optics and electronics to create a high quality video or still image from a small form factor device with lower power needs than conventional display technologies. Our strategy is to develop and supply PicoP display technology directly or through licensing arrangements to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in market segments including consumer electronics, automotive, and industrial for integration into their products.

During 2012, we aligned our operations to our ingredient brand strategy, simplifying our operations and resulting in an expected significant reduction to our future cash requirements. Our strategy is to focus our efforts on licensing our technology to partners who will produce display engines based on PicoP display technology and incorporate the engine into their products. Our development efforts are focused on supporting our customers in their manufacturing and integration and optimizing PicoP display technology for specific applications.

The primary objective for consumer applications is to provide users of mobile consumer devices such as smartphones, media players, tablet PCs and other consumer electronics products with a large screen viewing experience produced by a small projector either embedded in the device or via an attached accessory. These potential products would allow users to watch movies and videos, play video games, and display images and other data onto a variety of surfaces, freeing users from the limitations of a small, palm-sized screen. PicoP display technology could be further modified to be embedded into a pair of glasses to provide the mobile user with a see-through or occluded personal display to view movies, play games or access other content.

PicoP display technology is currently sold by Pioneer Corporation as part of an aftermarket high-resolution head-up display (HUD) that projects point-by-point navigation, critical operational, safety and other information important to the vehicle operator. With some modification PicoP display technology could also be embedded into a vehicle or integrated into a portable standalone HUD.

PicoP enabled devices can be used in field-based professions such as service repair or sales to view and share information such as schematics for equipment repair, sales data, orders or contact information within a CRM application on a larger, more user-friendly display. We also see potential for embedding PicoP display technology in industrial products where our displays could be used for 3D measuring and digital signage, enhancing the overall user experience of these applications. We continue to enter into a limited number of development agreements with commercial and U.S. government customers to develop advanced prototypes and demonstration units based on our light scanning technologies.

We develop and procure intellectual property rights relating to our technology as a key aspect of our business strategy. We generate intellectual property from our internal research and development activities and our ongoing performance on development contracts. We also have acquired exclusive rights to various technologies under licensing and acquisition agreements.

We currently sell our SHOWWX line of pico projectors. In 2012, we reduced our sales and marketing for these products and we do not expect to increase our investment in the SHOWWX product in the future.

We also currently sell our ROV hand held bar code scanners, which use our proprietary MEMS technology, and bar code scanner enabled enterprise solutions. We reduced our sales and marketing efforts on the bar code product in 2009 and we do not expect to increase our investment in the bar code product in the future.

We have incurred substantial losses since inception and expect to incur a substantial loss during the fiscal year ending December 31, 2013.


Key Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent liabilities. We evaluate our estimates on an on-going basis. We base our estimates on historical experience, terms of existing contracts, our evaluation of trends in the display and image capture industries, information provided by our current and prospective customers and strategic partners, information available from other outside sources, and on various other assumptions we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. The results form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

We believe the following key accounting policies require more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements:

Revenue Recognition. Our product sales generally include acceptance provisions. We recognize product revenue upon acceptance of the product by the customer or expiration of the contractual acceptance period, after which there are no rights of return. We have entered into agreements with resellers and distributors, as well as selling directly to the public. Sales made to resellers and distributors are recognized using either the sell-through method or upon expiration of the contractually agreed-upon acceptance period, depending on our ability to reasonably estimate returns. Some of the agreements with resellers and distributors contain price- protection clauses, and revenue is recognized net of these amounts. Sales made directly to the public are recognized either upon expiration of the contractual acceptance period after which there are no rights of return, or net of estimated returns and allowances. Provisions are made for warranties at the time revenue is recorded. Our quarterly revenue may vary substantially due to the timing of product orders from customers, production constraints and availability of components and raw materials.

We recognize contract revenue as work progresses on long-term, cost plus fixed fee, and fixed price contracts using the percentage-of-completion method, which relies on estimates of total expected contract revenue and costs. We have developed processes that allow us to make reasonable estimates of the cost to complete a contract. When we begin work on the contract and at the end of each accounting period, we estimate the labor, material and other costs required to complete the contract using information provided by our technical team, project managers, vendors, outside consultants and others and compare these to costs incurred to date. Since our contracts generally require some level of technology development to complete, the actual cost required to complete a contract can vary from our estimates. Recognized revenues are subject to revisions as actual cost becomes certain. Revisions in revenue estimates are reflected in the period in which the facts that give rise to the revision become known. Historically, we have made only immaterial revisions in the estimates to complete the contract at each reporting period. In the future, revisions in these estimates could significantly impact recognized revenue in any one reporting period. If the U.S. government cancels a contract, we would receive payment for work performed and costs committed to prior to the cancellation. We recognize contract revenue on the sale of prototype units and evaluation kits upon acceptance of the deliverables by the customer or expiration of the contractual acceptance period, after which there are no rights of return.

We establish an allowance for estimated losses if the estimated cost to complete a contract exceeds the remaining contract value. The entire estimated loss is recorded in the period in which the loss is first determined. We determine the estimated cost to complete a contract through a detailed review of the work to be completed, the resources available to complete the work and the technical difficulty of the remaining work. If the revised estimated cost to complete the contract is higher than the total contract revenue, the entire contract loss is recognized. The actual cost to complete a contract can vary significantly from the estimated cost, due to a variety of factors including availability of technical staff, availability of materials and technical difficulties that arise during a project. Most of our development contracts are cost plus fixed fee type contracts. Under these types of contracts, we are not required to spend more than the contract value to complete the contracted work.

Cost of Revenue. Cost of revenue includes both the direct and allocated indirect costs of performing on development contracts and producing prototype units, evaluation kits, SHOWWX and ROV units. Direct costs include labor, materials and other costs incurred directly in performing on a contract or producing prototype units, evaluation kits, and accessory pico projector products. Indirect costs include labor and other costs associated with operating our research and development department and building our manufacturing and technical capabilities and capacity. Our overhead, which includes the costs of procuring, inspecting and storing material, and facility and depreciation costs, is allocated to inventory, cost of product revenue, cost of contract revenue, and research and development expense based on the proportion of direct material purchased for the respective activity.


Allowance for uncollectible receivables. We maintain allowances for uncollectible receivables, including accounts receivable, cost and estimated earnings in excess of billings on uncompleted contracts and receivables from related parties. We review several factors in determining the allowances including the customer's and related party's past payment history and financial condition. If the financial condition of our customers or the related parties with whom we have receivables were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, additional allowances could be required.

Intangible Assets. Our intangible assets consist entirely of purchased patents. The patents are amortized using the straight-line method over their estimated period of benefit, ranging from one to 17 years. We evaluate the recoverability of intangible assets periodically by taking into account events or circumstances that may warrant revised estimates of useful lives or that indicate the asset may be impaired. We compare the projected undiscounted net cash flows associated with the related intangible assets or group of assets over their remaining lives against their respective carrying amounts. Measurement of an impairment loss for our intangible assets is based on the difference between the fair value of the asset and its carrying value.

Inventory. We value inventory at the lower of cost or market with cost determined on a net-realizable value basis. We make significant judgments and estimates to value our inventory and make adjustments to its carrying value. We review several factors in determining the market value of our inventory including evaluating the replacement cost of the raw materials, the net realizable value of the finished goods, and the likelihood of obsolescence. If we do not achieve our targeted sales prices, if market conditions for our components or products were to decline or if we do not achieve our sales forecast, additional reductions in the carrying value of the inventory would be required.

Employee Share-Based Compensation. We issue share-based compensation to employees in the form of options exercisable into our common stock and restricted or unrestricted shares of our common stock. We account for equity instruments issued to employees using the straight-line attribution method of allocating the fair value of share-based compensation expense over the requisite service period of the related award. The value of restricted or unrestricted shares is determined using the fair value method, which is based on the number of shares granted and the closing price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Market on the date of grant. The value of options is determined using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with estimates of option lives, stock price volatilities and interest rates, then expensed over the periods of service allowing for pre-vest forfeitures. This widely accepted method results in reasonable option values and interperiod expense allocation, and comparability across companies. Changes in the estimated inputs or using other option valuation methods could result in materially different option values and share-based compensation expense.

The key accounting policies described above are not intended to be a comprehensive list of all of our accounting policies. In many cases, the accounting treatment of a particular transaction is specifically dictated by generally accepted accounting principles, with no need for us to apply judgment or make estimates. There are also areas in which our judgment in selecting any available alternative would not produce a materially different result to our consolidated financial statements. Additional information about our accounting policies, and other disclosures required by generally accepted accounting principles, are set forth in the notes to our consolidated financial statements.

Inflation has not had a material impact on our revenues, or income from continuing operations over the three most recent fiscal years.

Results of Operations

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2012 COMPARED TO YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2011

Product Revenue.

                                % of                   % of
                               product                product
                     2012      revenue      2011      revenue     $ change     % change
(in thousands)
Product revenue   $ 6,782       100.0    $ 4,338       100.0    $   2,444         56.3

Product revenue primarily includes sales of components under our "Image by PicoP" ingredient brand business model and sales of our SHOWWX™ line of accessory pico projectors.


Our quarterly and annual revenue may vary substantially due to the timing of product orders from customers, production constraints and availability of components and raw materials. In 2012, we reduced our sales and marketing effort on our sales of our SHOWWX™ line of accessory pico projectors and we do not expect to increase our investment in this product line in the future.

Product revenue was higher during year ended December 31, 2012 than the same period in 2011, due to sales of components primarily to Pioneer Corporation for use in their Cyber Navi automotive heads up display system ("HUD") under our "Image by PicoP" ingredient brand business model and increased sales of our PicoP display engines compared to the prior periods. The backlog of product orders at December 31, 2012 was approximately $1.7 million, compared to $1.4 million at December 31, 2011. The product backlog is scheduled for delivery within one year.

Pioneer has reported a group net loss for the period April to December 2012. The group net loss has been attributed in part due to lower financial performance for its car navigation system business. As a result of this performance, we have reduced our expectations for significant 2013 follow-on orders for their after-market HUD product.

Contract Revenue.

                                        % of                    % of
                                      contract                contract
                            2012      revenue       2011      revenue      $ change     % change
(in thousands)
Government revenue       $   156          9.9    $   345         27.0    $    (189)       (54.8)
Commercial revenue         1,427         90.1        934         73.0          493         52.8
Total contract revenue   $ 1,583                 $ 1,279                 $     304         23.8

We earn contract revenue from performance on development contracts with the U.S. government and commercial customers and from the sale of prototype units and evaluation kits based on our PicoP display engine and sales of test equipment built specifically for use in PicoP display engine production. Our contract revenue from development contracts in a particular period is dependent upon when we enter into a contract, the value of the contracts we have entered into, and the availability of technical resources to perform work on the contracts. Our contract revenue from sales of prototype units and evaluation kits may vary substantially due to the timing of orders from customers and potential constraints on resources.

Contract revenue was higher during the year ended December 31, 2012 than the same period in 2011 due to increased sales of test fixtures, prototype units and evaluation kits in 2012 compared to the prior year.

Our backlog of development contracts, including orders for prototype units and evaluation kits, at December 31, 2012 was $100,000 compared to $622,000 at December 31, 2011, all of which is scheduled for completion during the next twelve months.

Cost of Product Revenue.

                                        % of                    % of
                                       product                 product
                             2012      revenue      2011       revenue     $ change     % change
(in thousands)
Cost of product revenue   $ 6,085        89.7    $ 11,640       268.3    $  (5,555)       (47.7)

Cost of product revenue includes the direct and allocated indirect cost of manufacturing products sold to customers. Direct costs include labor, materials and other costs incurred directly in the manufacture of these products. Indirect costs include labor and other costs associated with operating our manufacturing capabilities and capacity. In the event that we maintain production capacity in excess of production requirements, cost of product revenue may also include manufacturing overhead associated with the excess capacity.


Cost of product revenue for 2012 and 2011 included inventory write downs of $1.1 million and $1.6 million, respectively. The write downs were primarily for lower of cost or market adjustments to our inventory value to reflect the then current estimated selling price for our inventory, as well as a reserve adjustment for materials which we expect would become obsolete as we introduced new products. The decrease in cost of product revenue for 2012, compared to 2011, was primarily attributed to a change in product mix from lower margin SHOWWX products to sales of components to support Pioneer's Cyber Navi production and decreased inventory write downs compared to the prior year. During 2012 and 2011, we sold inventory which had been previously written down to the lower of cost or market. Accordingly, cost of product revenue for 2012 and 2011 did not include approximately $1.2 million and $1.7 million of previously recognized write downs associated with this inventory. During 2012, we recorded a credit of approximately $498,000 to cost of product revenue as a result of warranty expense lower than previous estimates. During 2011, we recognized approximately $850,000 of warranty expense primarily associated with our PicoP display engine.

During 2012 and 2011, we expensed approximately $523,000 and $1.3 million, respectively, of manufacturing overhead associated with production capacity in excess of production requirements.

The cost of product revenue as a percentage of product revenue can fluctuate significantly from period to period, depending on the product mix, the level of overhead expense and the volume of direct materials purchased.

Cost of Contract Revenue.

                                        % of                    % of
                                      contract                contract
                             2012     revenue       2011      revenue      $ change     % change
(in thousands)
Cost of contract revenue   $ 839         53.0    $ 1,425        111.4    $    (586)       (41.1)

The cost of contract revenue was lower in 2012 than in 2011 as a result of the lower activity on development contracts. Gross margin on contract revenue was significantly higher in 2012 compared to 2011. In 2011, we recorded losses on two development contracts. The losses were primarily as a result of our decision to share costs with one customer for development of advanced in-vehicle HUD prototypes in anticipation of follow-on revenue opportunities and excess material costs associated with minimum order quantities for materials required to complete one of our development contracts. The combined impact of the losses on contracts and lower gross margin was approximately $710,000 in 2011.

The cost of contract revenue as a percentage of revenue was lower in 2012 than in 2011 primarily as a result of not having recognized contract losses in 2012 as we did in 2011. The cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue can fluctuate significantly from period to period, depending on the contract cost mix and the levels of direct and indirect costs incurred.

Research and Development Expense.

2012 2011 $ change % change
(in thousands)
Research and development $ 13,135 $ 15,279 $ (2,144) (14.0)

Research and development expense consists of compensation related costs of employees and contractors engaged in internal research and product development activities, direct material to support development programs, laboratory operations, outsourced development and processing work, and other operating expenses. We allocate our research and development resources based on the business opportunity of the available projects, the skill mix of the resources available and the contractual commitments we have made to customers.

The decrease in research and development expense during 2012, compared to the same period in 2011, is primarily attributable to decreased payroll costs associated with reductions in staffing levels compared to the prior year and lower non-cash compensation expense resulting from the forfeiture of stock option grants.


We believe that a substantial level of continuing research and development expense will be required to develop additional commercial products using the PicoP technology. Accordingly, we anticipate our level of research and development spending will continue to be substantial.

Sales, Marketing, General and Administrative Expense.

                                               2012        2011       $ change     % change
(in thousands)
Sales, marketing, general and
administrative                              $ 11,252    $ 13,314    $  (2,062)       (15.5)

Sales, marketing, general and administrative expense includes compensation and support costs for marketing, sales, management and administrative staff, and for other general and administrative costs, including legal and accounting services, consultants and other operating expenses. We believe that under the ingredient brand business model we will have lower sales, marketing, general and administrative spending in the future than had we not implemented the strategy.

The decrease in sales, marketing, general and administrative expense during 2012, compared to the same period in 2011, is primarily due to decreased payroll costs associated with reductions in staffing levels compared to the prior year and lower non-cash compensation expense resulting from the forfeiture of stock option grants.

Other Income and Expense.

                             2012     2011     $ change     % change
(in thousands)
Other income and expense   $ 174    $ 222    $     (48)       (21.6)

The decrease in other income and expense in 2012 from 2011 results primarily from lower average cash, investment securities balances, and interest rates.

Income Taxes.

No provision for income taxes has been recorded because we have experienced net losses from inception through December 31, 2012. At December 31, 2012, we had net operating loss carry-forwards of approximately $305.9 million for federal income tax reporting purposes. In addition, we have research and development tax credits of $6.0 million. The net operating loss carry-forwards and research and development credits available to offset future taxable income, if any, will expire in varying amounts from 2017 to 2032 if not previously utilized. The research and development tax credits and the remaining net operating losses are scheduled to expire between 2017 and 2032. In certain circumstances, as specified in the Internal Revenue Code, a 50% or more ownership change by certain combinations of our shareholders during any three-year period would result in a limitation on our ability to utilize a portion of our net operating loss carry-forwards.

We recognize interest accrued and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits in tax expense. We did not have any unrecognized tax benefits at December 31, 2012 or at December 31, 2011.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

We have incurred significant losses since inception. We have funded operations to date primarily through the sale of common stock, convertible preferred stock, warrants, the issuance of convertible debt and, to a lesser extent, from development contract revenues and product sales. At December 31, 2012, we had $6.8 million in cash and cash equivalents.


Based on our current operating plan, we anticipate that we have sufficient cash and cash equivalents to fund our operations through the second quarter of 2013. We will require additional cash to fund our operating plan past that time. We are introducing new products into an emerging market which creates significant uncertainty about our ability to accurately project revenue, costs and cash flows. If the level of sales anticipated by our financial plan is not achieved or our working capital requirements are higher than planned, we will need to raise additional cash sooner or take actions to reduce operating expenses. We plan to obtain additional cash through the issuance of equity or debt securities. There can be no assurance that additional cash will be available or that, if available, it will be available on terms acceptable to us on a timely basis. If adequate funds are not available on a timely basis we may be required to limit our operations substantially. This limitation of operations could include reducing our planned investment in development projects resulting in reductions in staff, operating costs, capital expenditures and investment in research and development.

We have received a report from our independent registered public accounting firm regarding the consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2012 that includes an explanatory paragraph expressing substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. These financial statements are . . .

  Add MVIS to Portfolio     Set Alert         Email to a Friend  
Get SEC Filings for Another Symbol: Symbol Lookup
Quotes & Info for MVIS - All Recent SEC Filings
Sign Up for a Free Trial to the NEW EDGAR Online Pro
Detailed SEC, Financial, Ownership and Offering Data on over 12,000 U.S. Public Companies.
Actionable and easy-to-use with searching, alerting, downloading and more.
Request a Trial      Sign Up Now


Copyright © 2014 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy - Terms of Service
SEC Filing data and information provided by EDGAR Online, Inc. (1-800-416-6651). All information provided "as is" for informational purposes only, not intended for trading purposes or advice. Neither Yahoo! nor any of independent providers is liable for any informational errors, incompleteness, or delays, or for any actions taken in reliance on information contained herein. By accessing the Yahoo! site, you agree not to redistribute the information found therein.