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COOL > SEC Filings for COOL > Form 10-Q on 12-Mar-2013All Recent SEC Filings

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Form 10-Q for MAJESCO ENTERTAINMENT CO


12-Mar-2013

Quarterly Report


Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Statements in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q that are not historical facts constitute forward-looking statements that are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act. These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our or our industry's actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Those factors include, among other things, those listed under "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2012 and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as "may," "will," "should," "expects," "plans," "anticipates," "believes," "estimates," "predicts," "potential" or "continue" or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. These statements are only predictions. Actual events or results may differ materially. Moreover, neither we nor any other person assume responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of these statements. We are under no duty to update any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this report to conform these statements to actual results. References herein to "we," "us," "our," and the "Company" are to Majesco Entertainment Company.

Overview

We are a provider of video game products primarily for the family oriented, casual-game consumer. We sell our products primarily to large retail chains, specialty retail stores, video game rental outlets and distributors. We publish video games for almost all major current generation interactive entertainment hardware platforms, including Nintendo's DS, DSi, 3DS and Wii, Sony's PlayStation 3, or PS3, and PlayStation Portable, or PSP®, Microsoft's Xbox 360 and the personal computer, or PC. We also publish games for numerous digital platforms such as Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network, or PSN, and mobile platforms such as iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch, as well as online platforms such as Facebook and Zynga.com.

Our video game titles are targeted at various demographics at a range of price points. Due to the larger budget requirements for developing and marketing premium console titles for core gamers, we focus on publishing more casual games targeting casual-game consumers. In some instances, our titles are based on licenses of well known properties and, in other cases based on original properties. We enter into agreements with content providers and video game development studios for the creation of our video games.

Our operations involve similar products and customers worldwide. These products are developed and sold domestically and internationally. The Company is centrally managed and our chief operating decision makers, the chief executive and other officers, use consolidated and other financial information supplemented by sales information by product category, major product title and platform for making operational decisions and assessing financial performance. Accordingly, we operate in a single segment.

Net Revenues. Our revenues are principally derived from sales of our video games. We provide video games primarily for the mass market and casual game player. Our revenues are recognized net of estimated provisions for price protection and other allowances.

Cost of Sales. Cost of sales consists of product costs and amortization and impairment of software development costs and license fees. A significant component of our cost of sales is product costs. Product costs are comprised primarily of manufacturing and packaging costs of the disc or cartridge media, royalties to the platform manufacturer and manufacturing and packaging costs of peripherals. In cases where we act as a distributor for other publishers products, cost of sales may increase as we acquire products at a higher fixed wholesale price. While the product costs as a percentage of revenue is higher on these products, we do not incur upfront development and licensing fees or resulting amortization of capitalized software development costs. Commencing upon the related product's release, capitalized software development and intellectual property license costs are amortized to cost of sales. When, in management's estimate, future cash flows will not be sufficient to recover previously capitalized costs, we expense these capitalized costs to cost of sales - loss on impairment of capitalized software development costs and license fees - future releases. These expenses may be incurred prior to a game's release.

Gross Profit. Gross profit is the excess of net revenues over product costs and amortization and impairment of capitalized software development and license fees. Development and license fees incurred to produce video games are generally incurred up front and amortized to cost of sales. The recovery of these costs and total gross profit is dependent upon achieving a certain sales volume, which varies by title.

Product Research and Development Expenses. Product research and development expenses relate principally to our cost of supervision of third party video game developers, testing new products, development of social games and conducting quality assurance evaluations during the development cycle that are not allocated to games for which technological feasibility has been established. Costs incurred are primarily employee-related, may include equipment, and are not allocated to cost of sales.

Selling and Marketing Expenses. Selling and marketing expenses consist of marketing and promotion expenses, including television advertising, the cost of shipping products to customers and related employee costs. Credits to retailers for trade advertising are a component of these expenses.

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses primarily represent employee related costs, including corporate executive and support staff, general office expenses, professional fees and various other overhead charges. Professional fees, including legal and accounting expenses, typically represent the second largest component of our general and administrative expenses. These fees are partially attributable to our required activities as a publicly traded company, such as SEC filings.

Loss on Impairment of Capitalized Software Development Costs and License Fees- Cancelled Games. Loss on impairment of capitalized software development costs and license fees - cancelled games consists of contract termination costs, and the write-off of previously capitalized costs, for games that were cancelled prior to their release to market. We periodically review our games in development and compare the remaining cost to complete each game to projected future net cash flows expected to be generated from sales. In cases where we do not expect the projected future net cash flows generated from sales to be sufficient to cover the remaining incremental cash obligation to complete the game, we cancel the game, and record a charge to operating expenses. While we incur a current period charge on these cancellations, we believe we are limiting the overall loss on a game project that is no longer expected to perform as originally expected due to changing market conditions or other factors. Significant management estimates are required in making these assessments, including estimates regarding retailer and customer interest, pricing, competitive game performance, and changing market conditions.

Interest and Financing Costs. Interest and financing costs are directly attributable to our factoring and our purchase-order financing arrangements.

Income Taxes. Income taxes consists of our provision/(benefit) for income taxes. Utilization of our net operating loss ("NOL") carryforwards may be subject to a substantial annual limitation due to the "change in ownership" provisions of the Internal Revenue Code. The annual limitation may result in the expiration of NOL carryforwards before utilization. Due to our history of losses, a valuation allowance sufficient to fully offset our NOL and other deferred tax assets has been established under current accounting pronouncements, and this valuation allowance will be maintained until sufficient positive evidence exists to support its reversal. In fiscal 2012, we reversed our valuation allowance to the extent of our NOL used and recorded certain alternative minimum taxes and state taxes.

Seasonality and Variations in Interim Quarterly Results

Our quarterly net revenues, gross profit, and operating (loss) income are impacted significantly by the seasonality of the retail selling season, and the timing of the release of new titles. Sales of our catalog and other products are generally higher in the first and fourth quarters of our fiscal year (ending January 31 and October 31, respectively) due to increased retail sales during the holiday season. Sales and gross profit as a percentage of sales also generally increase in quarters in which we release significant new titles because of increased sales volume as retailers make purchases to stock their shelves and meet initial demand for the new release. These quarters also benefit from the higher selling prices that we are able to achieve early in the product's life cycle. Therefore, sales results in any one quarter are not necessarily indicative of expected results for subsequent quarters during the fiscal year.

Critical Accounting Estimates

Our discussion and analysis of the financial condition and results of operations is based upon our condensed consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or GAAP.

The preparation of these condensed consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

We have identified the policies below as critical to our business operations and to the understanding of our financial results. The impact and any associated risks related to these policies on our business operations is discussed throughout management's discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations when such policies affect our reported and expected financial results.

Revenue Recognition. We recognize revenue upon the shipment of our product when:
(1) risks and rewards of ownership are transferred; (2) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (3) we have no continuing obligations to the customer; and (4) the collection of related accounts receivable is probable. Certain products are sold to customers with a street date (the earliest date these products may be resold by retailers). Revenue for sales of these products is not recognized prior to their street date. Some of our software products provide limited online features at no additional cost to the consumer. Generally, we have considered such features to be incidental to our overall product offerings and an inconsequential deliverable. Accordingly, we do not defer any revenue related to products containing these limited online features. However, in instances where online features or additional functionality is considered a substantive deliverable in addition to the software product, such characteristics will be taken into account when applying our revenue recognition policy. To date, the Company has not earned significant revenues from such features. In addition, some of our software products are sold exclusively as downloads of digital content for which the consumer takes possession of the digital content for a fee. Revenue from product downloads is generally recognized when the download is made available (assuming all other recognition criteria are met).

When we enter into license or distribution agreements that provide for multiple copies of games in exchange for guaranteed amounts, revenue is recognized in accordance with the terms of the agreements, generally upon delivery of a master copy, assuming our performance obligations are complete and all other recognition criteria are met, or as per-copy royalties are earned on sales of games.

We operate hosted online games in which players can play for free and purchase virtual goods for use in the games. We recognize revenues from the sale of virtual goods as service revenues over the estimated period in which players use the game. We currently estimate these periods of use to be three to four months. We will periodically assess our estimates for this period of use and future increases or decreases in these estimates will affect our recognized revenues prospectively. We also recognize advertising revenue related to advertising placed on our game sites as ads are displayed.

Price Protection and Other Allowances. We generally sell our products on a no-return basis, although in certain instances, we provide price protection or other allowances on certain unsold products in accordance with industry practices. Price protection, when granted and applicable, allows customers a partial credit with respect to merchandise unsold by them. Revenue is recognized net of estimates of these allowances. Sales incentives and other consideration that represent costs incurred by us for benefits received, such as the appearance of our products in a customer's national circular advertisement, are generally reflected as selling and marketing expenses. We estimate potential future product price protection and other discounts related to current period product revenue. In addition, some of our software products are sold exclusively as downloads of digital content for which the consumer takes possession of the digital content for a fee. Revenue from product downloads is generally recognized when the download is made available (assuming all other recognition criteria are met).

Our provisions for price protection and other allowances fluctuate over periods as a result of a number of factors including analysis of historical experience, current sell-through of retailer inventory of our products, current trends in the interactive entertainment market, the overall economy, changes in customer demand and acceptance of our products and other related factors. Significant management judgments and estimates must be made and used in connection with establishing the allowance for returns and price protection in any accounting period. However, actual allowances granted could materially exceed our estimates as unsold products in the distribution channels are exposed to rapid changes in consumer preferences, market conditions, technological obsolescence due to new platforms, product updates or competing products. For example, the risk of requests for allowances may increase as consoles pass the midpoint of their lifecycle and an increasing number of competitive products heighten pricing and competitive pressures. While management believes it can make reliable estimates regarding these matters, these estimates are inherently subjective. Accordingly, if our estimates change, this will result in a change in our provisions, which would impact the net revenues and/or selling and marketing expenses we report. Fluctuations in the provisions reflected our estimates of future price protection based on the factors discussed above. We limit our exposure to credit risk by factoring a portion of our receivables to a third party that buys without recourse. For receivables that are not sold without recourse, we analyze our aged accounts receivables, payment history and other factors to make a determination if collection of receivables is likely, or a provision for uncollectible accounts is necessary.

Capitalized Software Development Costs and License Fees. Software development costs include development fees, primarily in the form of milestone payments made to independent software developers. Software development costs are capitalized once technological feasibility of a product is established and management expects such costs to be recoverable against future revenues. For products where proven game engine technology exists, this may occur early in the development cycle. Technological feasibility is evaluated on a product-by-product basis. Amounts related to software development that are not capitalized are charged immediately to product research and development costs. Commencing upon a related product's release capitalized software development costs are amortized to cost of sales based upon the higher of (i) the ratio of current revenue to total projected revenue or (ii) straight-line charges over the expected marketable life of the product.

Prepaid license fees represent license fees to holders for the use of their intellectual property rights in the development of our products. Minimum guaranteed royalty payments for intellectual property licenses are initially recorded as an asset (capitalized license fees) and a current liability (accrued royalties payable) at the contractual amount upon execution of the contract or when specified milestones or events occur and when no significant performance commitment remains with the licensor. Licenses are expensed to cost of sales at the higher of (i) the contractual royalty rate based on actual sales or (ii) an effective rate based upon total projected revenue related to such license.

Capitalized software development costs are classified as non-current if they relate to titles for which we estimate the release date to be more than one year from the balance sheet date.

The amortization period for capitalized software development costs and license fees is usually no longer than one year from the initial release of the product. If actual revenues or revised forecasted revenues fall below the initial forecasted revenue for a particular license, the charge to cost of sales may be larger than anticipated in any given quarter. The recoverability of capitalized software development costs and license fees is evaluated quarterly based on the expected performance of the specific products to which the costs relate.

When, in management's estimate, future cash flows will not be sufficient to recover previously capitalized costs, we expense these capitalized costs to cost of sales - loss on impairment of capitalized software development costs and license fees - future releases, in the period such a determination is made. These expenses may be incurred prior to a game's release. If a game is cancelled and never released to market, the amount is expensed to operating costs and expenses - loss on impairment of capitalized software development costs and license fees - cancelled games. As of January 31, 2013, the net carrying value of our licenses and capitalized software development costs was $4.3 million. If we were required to write off licenses or capitalized software development costs, due to changes in market conditions or product acceptance, our results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

License fees and milestone payments made to our third party developers are typically considered non-refundable advances against the total compensation they can earn based upon the sales performance of the products. Any additional royalty or other compensation earned beyond the milestone payments is expensed to cost of sales as incurred.

We have expensed as research and development all costs associated with the development of social games. These games have not earned significant revenues to date and we are continuing to evaluate alternatives for future development and monetization.

Inventory. Inventory is stated at the lower of cost or market. Cost is determined by the first-in, first-out method. We estimate the net realizable value of slow-moving inventory on a title-by-title basis and charge the excess of cost over net realizable value to cost of sales. Some of our inventory items are packaged with accessories, such as basketballs for our NBA Baller Beats game, belts for our Zumba games and dolls for our Babysitting Mama game. The purchase of these accessories involves longer lead times and minimum purchase amounts, which require us to maintain higher levels of inventory than for other games. Therefore, these items have a higher risk of obsolescence, which we review periodically based on inventory and sales levels.

Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation. Stock-based compensation expense is measured at the grant date based on the fair value of the award and is recognized as expense over the vesting period. Determining the fair value of stock-based awards at the grant date requires judgment, including, in the case of stock option awards, estimating expected stock volatility. In addition, judgment is also required in estimating the amount of stock-based awards that are expected to be forfeited. If actual results differ significantly from these estimates, stock-based compensation expense and our results of operations could be materially impacted.

Commitments and Contingencies. We record a liability for commitments and contingencies when the amount is both probable and reasonably estimable. We record associated legal fees as incurred.

Results of Operations

Three months ended January 31, 2013 versus three months ended January 31, 2012

Net Revenues. Net revenues for the three months ended January 31, 2013 decreased approximately 65% to $23.5 million from $66.2 million in the comparable quarter last year. The decrease was primarily due to lower sales of our Zumba Fitness products and lower revenues from new releases on the Microsoft Kinect and Nintendo 3DS. The decline in Zumba sales was due to the timing of our newly released titles, and a lower demand for our Zumba products for the Nintendo Wii. We released Zumba Fitness 2 for the Nintendo Wii in North America and Europe in November 2011; therefore, all launch sales and holiday re-orders were included in our first fiscal quarter of 2012. Comparably, we launched our third Zumba game, Zumba Core, in October 2012, resulting in approximately $10.9 million of launch sales being reflected in the fourth quarter of our 2012 fiscal year. Additionally, retail sales during the holiday selling season of Zumba games for the Wii were significantly less than in the prior year. Software sales for all video games for the Nintendo Wii declined approximately 44% in 2012 compared to the prior year, according to NPD, reflecting the end of life of the Wii platform. We also released a smaller slate of products on the Microsoft Kinect and Nintendo 3DS in the first quarter of 2013 when compared to 2012 due to uncertain market conditions for these platforms. Net revenues in the European market decreased approximately $10.6 million from $16.7 million during the same period a year ago. Overall Zumba sales accounted for 67% of our net revenues during the period, compared to 77% in the prior year.

The following table sets forth our net revenues by platform:

                                   Three months Ended January 31,
                            2013            %            2012            %
                        (thousands)                  (thousands)
Nintendo Wii                  $12,584        54%     $      47,447        72 %
Microsoft Xbox 360              5,594        24%             9,597        14 %
Nintendo DS/3DS                 4,740        20%             8,034        12 %
Sony Playstation 3                172         1%               432         1 %
Accessories and other             382         1%               670         1 %
TOTAL                         $23,472       100%     $      66,180       100 %

Gross Profit. Gross profit for the three months ended January 31, 2013 was $7.2 million compared to a gross profit of $23.0 million in the same quarter last year. The decrease in gross profit was primarily attributable to decreased net revenues for the three months ended January 31, 2013, as discussed above. Gross profit as a percentage of net sales was 30% for the three months ended January 31, 2013, compared to 35% for the three months ended January 31, 2012. The decrease in gross profit as a percentage of sales primarily reflects lower average selling prices and higher development and license fees in the current period and changes in product mix between the periods.

Product Research and Development Expenses. Research and development expenses were $2.1 million for the three months ended January 31, 2013, compared to $2.3 million of expenses for the same period in 2012. Lower development expenses for console games and profit-based incentive compensation were partially offset by increased third-party development costs of mobile games in the current-year period.

Selling and Marketing Expenses. Total selling and marketing expenses were approximately $3.7 million for the three months ended January 31, 2013, compared to $9.0 million for the three months ended January 31, 2012. The decrease was primarily due to decreased media advertising related to Zumba and other new releases, lower commissions and other costs associated with lesser sales volumes and lower accrued profit-based incentive compensation.

General and Administrative Expenses. For the three-month period ended January 31, 2013, general and administrative expenses decreased to $2.3 million from $3.0 million in the comparable prior-year period. The decrease primarily reflected lower accrued expenses for incentive compensation accrued in the prior year period based on operating income and lower stock-based compensation due to the effect of forfeitures in the current-year period.

Workforce Reduction.Workforce reduction costs amounted to $776 in the three months ended January 31, 2013. There were no such costs in the prior-year period. On January 8, 2013, we implemented a realignment of our workforce to reduce certain fixed costs and provide for a more flexible variable cost based model using outside subcontractors in the production of our games. The realignment included a reduction in workforce of approximately 40 employees. Workforce reduction costs consist primarily of severance costs.

Loss on Impairment of Capitalized Software Development Costs and License Fees - Cancelled Games. For the three-month period ended January 31, 2013, loss on impairment of capitalized software development costs and license fees - cancelled games, amounted to $0.2 million compared to $1.0 million in the prior-year period. Our games in development are subject to periodic reviews to assess game design and changing market conditions. When we do not expect the projected future net cash flows generated from sales to be sufficient to cover the remaining incremental cash obligation to complete a game, we cancel the game, and record a charge to operating expenses for the carrying amount of the game.

Operating (Loss) Income. Operating loss for the three months ended January 31, 2013 was approximately $2.0 million, compared to operating income of $7.6 million in the comparable period in 2012, primarily as a result of decreased revenues and gross profits discussed above and to approximately $0.8 million of accrued severance costs associated with our January 2013 workforce reduction.

Change in Fair Value of Warrant Liability. We have outstanding warrants that contain a provision that may require settlement by transferring assets and are, therefore, recorded at fair value as liabilities. We recorded a gain of $0.8 million for the three months ended January 31, 2012, reflecting a decrease in the fair value of the warrants primarily based upon the decreased market price of a share of our common stock during the period. In the three months ended January 31, 2013, fair value of the warrants, which expire in March 2013, and the change in the fair value of the warrant liability, was not significant.

Income Taxes. In the three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, our income tax expense was $0 and $0.2 million, respectively, representing our current . . .

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