Search the web
Welcome, Guest
[Sign Out, My Account]
EDGAR_Online

Quotes & Info
Enter Symbol(s):
e.g. YHOO, ^DJI
Symbol Lookup | Financial Search
TMS > SEC Filings for TMS > Form 10-Q on 6-Nov-2012All Recent SEC Filings

Show all filings for TMS INTERNATIONAL CORP.

Form 10-Q for TMS INTERNATIONAL CORP.


6-Nov-2012

Quarterly Report


Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion and analysis of our consolidated results of operations, financial condition and liquidity should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report. The following discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our current expectations, estimates, forecast and projections. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual outcomes and results may differ materially from those expressed in these forward-looking statements. See "Risk Factors" and "Forward-Looking Statements."

Introduction

The following discussion is provided to supplement the consolidated financial statements and the related notes included in Part 1, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report to help provide an understanding of our financial condition, changes in financial condition and results of our operations, and is organized as follows:

Company Overview. This section provides a general description of our business in order to better understand our financial condition and results of operations and to anticipate future trends and risks in our business.

Certain Line Items Presented. This section provides an explanation of certain GAAP line items that are presented in our consolidated financial statements included in this Quarterly Report. These line items are discussed in detail under the heading "Results of Operations" below for the periods presented.

Key Measures We Use to Evaluate Our Company. This section provides an overview of certain non-GAAP measures that we believe are critical to understand in order to evaluate and assess our business. These are the measures that management utilizes most to assess our results of operations, anticipate future trends and risks and determine compensation levels, including under our management bonus plan.

Application of Critical Accounting Policies. This section discusses the accounting policies and estimates that we consider important to our financial condition and results of operations and that require significant judgment and estimates on the part of management in their application.

Results of Operations. This section provides a discussion of our results of operations for the third quarter and nine-month period ended September 30, 2012 compared to the third quarter and nine-month period ended September 30, 2011.

Liquidity and Capital Resources. This section provides an analysis of our cash flows for the nine-month period ending September 30, 2012 compared to the nine-month period ended September 30, 2011. This section also includes a discussion of our liquidity and Capital Expenditures.

Company Overview

We are the largest provider of outsourced industrial services to steel mills in North America as measured by revenue and have a substantial and growing international presence. We offer the most comprehensive suite of outsourced industrial services to the steel industry. Our employees and equipment are embedded at customer sites and are integral throughout the steel production process other than steel making itself. Our services are critical to our customers' 24-hour-a-day operations, enabling them to generate substantial operational efficiencies and cost savings while focusing on their core business of steel making. We operate at 80 customer sites in 10 countries across North America, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East and our global raw materials procurement network spans five continents. Over the past 80 years we have established long-standing customer relationships and have served our top 10 customers, on average, for over 34 years. Our diversified customer base includes 12 of the top 15 largest global steel producers, including United States Steel, ArcelorMittal, Gerdau, Nucor, Baosteel, POSCO and Tata Steel.


Table of Contents

We provide a broad range of services through two reporting segments: our Mill Services Group and our Raw Material and Optimization Group:

Mill Services Group. The services provided under this segment are performed at our customer sites under long-term contracts. These contracts are typically structured on a fee-per-ton basis tied to production volumes at our customer sites and are not based on the underlying price of steel. In addition, our contracts typically include tiered pricing structures, with unit prices that increase as volumes decline, and/or minimum monthly fees, each of which stabilizes our revenue in the event of volume fluctuations. The services provided to our customers under this segment include: (1) scrap management and preparation; (2) semi-finished and finished material handling; (3) metal recovery and slag handling, processing and sales; and (4) surface conditioning. The revenues from these services appear in the line item "Service Revenue" on our statement of operations, and the costs associated therewith appear in "Site Operating Costs" on our statement of operations. Substantially all of our Capital Expenditures, whether Growth Capital Expenditures or Maintenance Capital Expenditures, are incurred in connection with the services provided by this segment. This segment also includes the results of operations at our location where we buy, process and sell scrap for our own account, which revenues appear in the line item "Revenue from Sale of Materials" on our statement of operations and the costs associated therewith appear in "Cost of Raw Materials Shipments" on our statement of operations. The Total Revenue and Cost of Raw Materials Shipments from this location will fluctuate based upon the underlying price of scrap.

Raw Material and Optimization Group. The services provided under this segment include: (1) raw materials procurement and logistics; and
(2) proprietary software-based raw materials cost optimization. Revenues for the raw materials procurement and logistics services we provide are primarily generated pursuant to two alternative transaction models: (1) a contractually determined, volume-based fee for arranging delivery of raw materials shipments to a customer directly from a vendor with no price or inventory risk; or (2) a generally concurrent arrangement to purchase for our own account and sell raw materials at specified prices, typically locking in a margin with minimal price or inventory risk. In addition, we occasionally take measured market risk in connection with our raw materials procurement services by either purchasing raw materials at a fixed price without an immediate corresponding sale order or agreeing to sell raw materials at a fixed price before having procured such materials. The revenues from our raw materials procurement and logistics services appear in the line item "Revenue from Sale of Materials" and the related costs appear in the line item "Cost of Raw Materials Shipments" on our statement of operations. Our earnings are primarily driven by the steel production volumes of our customers rather than by the prices of steel or raw materials. We subtract the Cost of Raw Materials Shipments from Revenue from Sale of Materials, because market prices of the raw materials we procure for and generally concurrently sell to our customers are offset on our statement of operations. By subtracting the Cost of Raw Materials Shipments, we isolate the margin that we make on our raw materials procurement and logistics services, and we are better able to evaluate our performance in terms of the volume of raw materials we procure for our customers and the margin we generate. We refer to this measure as "Revenue After Raw Materials Costs," which is a non-GAAP financial measure that we believe is critical in order to assess and evaluate our business. For additional information on Revenue After Raw Materials Costs, see "-Key Measures We Use to Evaluate Our Company-Revenue After Raw Materials Costs" below.

The vast majority of our Revenue After Raw Materials Costs and profitability is tied to our customers' production volumes. Factors that impact a steel mill's production levels include general economic conditions, North American and global demand for steel, competition and competitive pricing, and the relative strength of the U.S. dollar.

Over the last five years, we have expanded from primarily generating our Revenue After Raw Materials Costs and Adjusted EBITDA from North America, to generating approximately 26% and 24% of our year to date 2012 Revenue After Raw Materials Costs and Adjusted EBITDA, respectively, internationally. We believe we have substantial international growth opportunities which will be driven by expansion of our market share and continued growth in outsourcing in developing markets, such as Latin America, Eastern Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Initial Public Offering

Offering details and proceeds

In April 2011 we completed an initial public offering of 12,880,000 shares of our Class A Common Stock. A registration statement relating to these securities (File No. 333-166807) was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and declared effective on April 8, 2011. Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC were the joint book runners for the initial public offering. On


Table of Contents

April 19, 2011, we issued and sold 9,200,000 shares of Class A Common Stock and certain of our stockholders sold 2,000,000 shares of Class A Common Stock. The shares were sold at a public offering price of $13.00 per share, with an aggregate public offering price of $145.6 million. The underwriting discount was $0.845 per share, or $9.5 million in total. The initial public offering generated $111.8 million of proceeds to us before expenses and $24.3 million of proceeds to the selling stockholders before expenses. We did not receive any proceeds from the sale of Class A Common Stock by the selling stockholders.

We used $44.0 million of proceeds from the initial public offering to pay off in full our obligations under the series 2008 promissory notes. The remaining proceeds were retained for general corporate purposes.

On April 29, 2011, we completed the sale of an additional 1,680,000 shares of Class A Common Stock pursuant to the underwriters' overallotment option. The shares were sold at a public offering price of $13.00 per share, with an aggregate public offering price of $21.8 million. After deducting the underwriting discount of $0.845 per share, or $1.4 million in total, we realized $20.4 million of proceeds before expenses.

Through December 31, 2010, we had incurred $1.8 million of incremental costs related directly to the initial public offering. Those costs were recorded as a prepaid asset at December 31, 2010. In 2011, we incurred $1.7 million of additional incremental costs related directly to the initial public offering. After deducting the total incremental costs the initial public offering generated net proceeds to us of $128.7 million.

In connection with the initial public offering, our Class A preferred stock automatically converted into 23,384,801 shares of Class B Common Stock. Immediately following our initial public offering, including the related stock split and conversion of series A preferred stock, we had outstanding 39,255,973 shares of common stock of which 12,880,000 shares were Class A Common Stock and 26,375,973 shares were Class B Common Stock.

Amendment to certificate of incorporation and stock split

On April 5, 2011, in connection with but prior to our initial public offering, we amended and restated our certificate of incorporation creating two classes of common stock: Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock. Our previously-outstanding shares of common stock, including those issued under the restricted stock plan, were converted into shares of Class B Common Stock. The amended and restated certificate of incorporation also provided for a stock split to occur on the date of pricing of the Company's initial public offering. We priced an initial public offering on April 13, 2011 at $13.00 per share and effectuated a 207.4307-for-one stock split of our common stock.

Restricted Stock Plan grant and accelerated vesting

Also in connection with the initial public offering, we accelerated vesting of the remaining unvested shares under our restricted stock plan. The remaining 53,105 shares of restricted stock that were unvested at the initial public offering, vested upon completion of the initial public offering. As a result of this modification, we recorded a $0.7 million charge in April 2011. We also granted an additional 47,180 shares under the restricted stock plan concurrently with the initial public offering. Those shares vested immediately and we recorded a $0.6 million charge in April 2011 related to the grant.

Long Term Incentive Plan

Also in connection with the IPO, we established our Long Term Incentive Plan and reserved 1,558,170 shares for issuance under that plan. On April 19, 2011, we awarded options to purchase 519,390 shares of Class A Common Stock, subject to vesting conditions, at an exercise price of $13.00 per share, the public offering price for shares sold in our initial public offering.

Certain Line Items Presented

Revenue from Sale of Materials. Revenue from Sale of Materials is generated by each of our two operating segments as follows:

Our Mill Services Group generates Revenue from Sale of Materials by buying, processing, and selling scrap for our own account.

Our Raw Material and Optimization Group primarily generates Revenue from Sale of Materials through raw materials procurement activities using two alternative transaction models. In the first type we take no title to the materials being procured and we record only our commission as revenue; in the second type, we take title to the material and sell it to a buyer, typically in a transaction where a buyer and seller are matched, and we record Revenue from Sale of Materials for the full value of the material based on the amount we invoice to our customer.


Table of Contents

In the first nine months of 2012, approximately 8% of our Revenue from Sale of Materials was generated by our Mill Services Group, and approximately 92% of our Revenue from Sale of Materials was generated by the raw materials procurement activities of our Raw Material and Optimization Group.

Service Revenue. Service Revenue is generated from our two operating segments as follows:

Our Mill Services Group generates Service Revenue from the services we provide to customers at their sites. This Service Revenue is generated from a combination of: (1) contractually committed base monthly fees;
(2) fees for services based on customer production volumes; and
(3) revenue from the sale of steel manufacturing co-products sold for our own account, less a royalty fee paid to the host mill.

Our Raw Material and Optimization Group generates Service Revenue by providing our proprietary software-based raw materials cost optimization service, which calculates the lowest cost blend of raw materials necessary to make a customer's specified chemistry of steel. We typically charge an optimization service fee for each ton of scrap used in steel manufacturing.

In the first nine months of 2012, approximately 99% of our Service Revenue was generated by our Mill Services Group, and approximately 1% of our Service Revenue was generated by our Raw Material and Optimization Group.

Cost of Raw Materials Shipments. The activities that generate Revenue from Sale of Materials also incur Cost of Raw Materials Shipments, and are described as follows:

Our Mill Services Group generates Revenue from Sale of Materials by buying, processing and selling scrap for our own account. We record the cost of the purchase of raw materials as Cost of Raw Materials Shipments.

Our Raw Material and Optimization Group generates Revenue from Sale of Materials through our raw materials procurement activities. When we arrange to purchase and sell scrap and other raw materials, the cost of such materials purchased and other direct costs including transportation are recorded as Cost of Raw Materials Shipments.

Site Operating Costs. Our Site Operating Costs are highly variable and largely correlated to the volume of steel produced at our customer sites. Site Operating Costs are predominantly incurred by our Mill Services Group and consist of employees' wages, employee benefits, costs of operating supplies such as fuels and lubricants, repair and maintenance costs and equipment leasing costs.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses. Our Selling, General and Administrative Expenses consist of labor and related costs of selling and administration, professional fees, insurance costs, management fees, bad debt costs, bank fees and corporate expenses and bonuses.

Depreciation and Amortization. Our consolidated Depreciation consists of depreciation expenses related to property, plant and equipment. Our consolidated Amortization consists of amortization expenses related to finite life intangibles such as environmental permits, customer related intangibles, patents and unpatented technology, in each case recognized on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset.

Income (Loss) from Operations. Income (Loss) from Operations consists of Total Revenue less Total Costs and Expenses but does not include Interest Expense, Net.

Key Measures We Use to Evaluate Our Company

In addition to the GAAP line items described above, we also use the following additional financial measures to evaluate and assess our business:

Revenue After Raw Materials Costs. We measure our sales volume on the basis of Revenue After Raw Materials Costs, which we define as Total Revenue minus Cost of Raw Materials Shipments. Revenue After Raw Materials Costs is not a recognized financial measure under GAAP, but we believe it is useful in measuring our operating performance because it excludes the fluctuations in the market prices of the raw materials we procure for and sell to our customers. We subtract the Cost of Raw Materials Shipments from Total Revenue because market prices of the raw materials we procure for and generally concurrently sell to our customers are offset on our statement of operations. Further, in our raw materials procurement business, we generally engage in two alternative types of transactions that require different accounting treatments for Total Revenue. In the first type, we take no title to the materials being procured and we record only our commission as revenue; in the second type, we take title to the materials and sell it to a buyer, typically in a transaction where a buyer and seller are matched. By subtracting the Cost of Raw Materials Shipments, we isolate the margin that we make on our raw materials procurement and logistics services, and we are better able to evaluate our operating performance in terms of the volume of raw materials we procure for our customers and the margin we generate.


Table of Contents

Adjusted EBITDA. Adjusted EBITDA is not a recognized financial measure under GAAP, but we believe it is useful in measuring our operating performance. Adjusted EBITDA is used internally to determine our incentive compensation levels, including under our management bonus plan, and it is required, with some additional adjustments, in certain covenant compliance calculations under our senior secured credit facilities. We also use Adjusted EBITDA to benchmark the performance of our business against expected results, to analyze year-over-year trends and to compare our operating performance to that of our competitors. We also use Adjusted EBITDA as a performance measure because it excludes the impact of tax provisions and Depreciation and Amortization, which are difficult to compare across periods due to the impact of accounting for business combinations and the impact of tax net operating losses on cash taxes paid. In addition, we use Adjusted EBITDA as a performance measure of our operating segments in accordance with ASC Topic 280, Disclosures About Segments of an Enterprise and Related Information. We believe that the presentation of Adjusted EBITDA enhances our investors' overall understanding of the financial performance of and prospects for our business.

Adjusted EBITDA Margin. Adjusted EBITDA Margin is not a recognized financial measure under GAAP, but we believe it is useful in measuring our operating performance. We calculate Adjusted EBITDA Margin by dividing our Adjusted EBITDA by our Revenue After Raw Materials Costs. We use Adjusted EBITDA Margin to measure our profitability and our control of cash operating costs relative to Revenue After Raw Materials Costs.

Capital Expenditures. We separate our Capital Expenditures into two categories:
(1) Growth Capital Expenditures and (2) Maintenance Capital Expenditures. We separate our Capital Expenditures between these two categories because it helps us to differentiate between the discretionary cash we invest in our growth and the cash required to maintain our existing business. Growth Capital Expenditures and Maintenance Capital Expenditures are not recognized financial measures under GAAP, but we believe they are useful in measuring our operating performance. We also use these measures as a component in determining our performance-based compensation.

Growth Capital Expenditures relate to the establishment of our operations at new customer sites, the performance of additional services or significant productivity improvements at existing customer sites. We incur Growth Capital Expenditures when we win a new contract. Our Mill Services Group contracts generally require that we acquire the capital equipment necessary to provide the service in advance of receiving revenue from the contract.

We incur Maintenance Capital Expenditures as part of our ongoing operations. Maintenance Capital Expenditures generally include: (1) the cost of normal replacement of capital equipment used at existing customer sites on existing contracts; (2) any additional capital expenditures made in connection with the extension of an existing contract; and (3) any capital costs associated with acquiring previously leased equipment. We generally replace our equipment on a schedule that is based on the operating hours of that equipment. We expect Maintenance Capital Expenditures to be greater in periods where our customers' production volumes are high, requiring us to operate more hours. Conversely, when our customers are producing less, we would expect fewer operating hours and reduced Maintenance Capital Expenditures.

Discretionary Cash Flow. Discretionary Cash Flow is not a recognized financial measure under GAAP. We calculate Discretionary Cash Flow as our Adjusted EBITDA minus our Maintenance Capital Expenditures, and we believe it is an important measure in analyzing our liquidity. In combination with our available liquidity, we use our Discretionary Cash Flow to assist us in determining our capacity to:
(1) invest in Growth Capital Expenditures; (2) finance changes in our working capital, particularly in our raw materials procurement activities; and
(3) voluntarily repay portions of our debt obligations. In addition, we use this measure to help determine how efficiently we are managing our assets, and we also use it as a component in determining our performance-based compensation. The term "Discretionary Cash Flow" used in this quarterly report replaces the term "Free Cash Flow" used by us in certain prior reports.

Application of Critical Accounting Policies

The preparation of our consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires us to make estimates and assumptions in applying our critical accounting policies that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. We continually evaluate our judgments and estimates in determining our financial condition and operating results. Estimates are based upon information available as of the date of the financial statements and, accordingly, actual results could differ from these estimates, sometimes materially. Critical accounting policies and estimates are defined as those that are both most important to the portrayal of our financial condition and operating results and require management's most subjective judgments. The most critical accounting policies and estimates are described below.


Table of Contents

Revenue Recognition. Revenue includes two categories: (1) Revenue from Sale of Materials and (2) Service Revenue.

Revenue from Sale of Materials is mainly generated by our raw materials procurement business, although it also includes revenue from our Mill Services Group location where we buy, process and sell scrap for our own account. We recognize Revenue from Sale of Materials when title and risk of loss pass to the customer, which is determined by the terms of the sale.

We generate Service Revenue from scrap management, scrap preparation, raw materials optimization, metal recovery and sales, material handling or product handling, slag processing and metal recovery services, surface conditioning and other services. We recognize revenue when we perform the service or when title and risk of loss pass to the buyer.

In our raw materials procurement business, we generally engage in two types of transactions that require different accounting treatment. For certain transactions, we facilitate the purchase or sale of raw materials between a buyer and seller for a volume-based commission. The seller assumes the credit risk after delivery. At no point in the transaction do we take title to or assume the risk of loss of the material. We record only the commission as revenue on these transactions.

For other raw materials procurement transactions, we purchase the material from a seller and sell it to a buyer. In these transactions, we take title to the material and assume the risk of loss for some period of time, usually during transit between the seller and the buyer for F.O.B. destination sales. While we take steps to mitigate credit loss exposure, we also assume credit risk for the full amount billed to the customer. In these transactions, we record Revenue from Sale of Materials for the full value of the material based on the amount we invoice to our customer.

Trade Receivables. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers and generally do not require our customers to post collateral, although we typically require letters of credit or other credit assurances in our raw materials procurement business for international transactions. Account balances outstanding longer than the payment terms are considered past due and provisions are made for estimated uncollectible receivables. Our estimates are based on historical collection experience, a review of the current status of receivables, our judgment of the credit quality of our customer and the condition of the general economy and the industry. Decisions to charge off receivables are based on management's judgment after consideration of facts and circumstances surrounding potential uncollectible accounts.

Property, Plant and Equipment. Property, plant and equipment are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation. Costs in connection with business combinations are based on fair market value at the time of acquisition. Major components of certain high value equipment are recorded as separate assets with depreciable lives determined independently from the remainder of the asset. . . .

  Add TMS to Portfolio     Set Alert         Email to a Friend  
Get SEC Filings for Another Symbol: Symbol Lookup
Quotes & Info for TMS - All Recent SEC Filings
Copyright © 2014 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy - Terms of Service
SEC Filing data and information provided by EDGAR Online, Inc. (1-800-416-6651). All information provided "as is" for informational purposes only, not intended for trading purposes or advice. Neither Yahoo! nor any of independent providers is liable for any informational errors, incompleteness, or delays, or for any actions taken in reliance on information contained herein. By accessing the Yahoo! site, you agree not to redistribute the information found therein.