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SNPS > SEC Filings for SNPS > Form 10-K on 16-Dec-2011All Recent SEC Filings

Show all filings for SYNOPSYS INC

Form 10-K for SYNOPSYS INC


16-Dec-2011

Annual Report


Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Overview

The following summary of our financial condition and results of operations is qualified in its entirety by the more complete discussion contained in this Item 7 and by the risk factors set forth in Item 1A of this Annual Report. Please also see the cautionary language at the beginning of Part 1 of this Annual Report regarding forward-looking statements.

Business Summary

Synopsys is a world leader in providing technology solutions used to develop electronics and electronic systems. We supply the electronic design automation (EDA) software that engineers use to design, create prototypes for and test integrated circuits, also known as chips. We also supply software and hardware used to develop the systems that incorporate integrated circuits and the software that runs on those integrated circuits. Our intellectual property (IP) products are pre-designed circuits that engineers use as components of larger chip designs rather than redesigning those circuits themselves. To complement these product offerings, we provide technical services to support our solutions and we help our customers develop chips and electronic systems.

Our customers are generally large semiconductor and electronics manufacturers. Our solutions help them overcome the challenge of developing increasingly advanced electronics products while


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reducing their design and manufacturing costs. While our products are an important part of our customers' development process, our customers' research and development budget and spending decisions may be impacted by their business outlook and their willingness to invest in new and increasingly complex chip designs.

Despite recent global economic uncertainty, we have maintained profitability and positive cash flow on an annual basis in recent years. We achieved these results not only because of our solid execution, leading technology and strong customer relationships, but also because of our recurring revenue business model. Under this model, a substantial majority of our customers pay for their licenses over time and we typically recognize this recurring revenue over the life of the contract, which averages approximately three years. Recurring revenue generally represents more than 90% of our total revenue. The revenue we recognize in a particular period generally results from selling efforts in prior periods rather than the current period. We typically enter each quarter with greater than 90% of our revenue for that particular quarter already committed from our customers, providing for stability and predictability of results. Due to our business model, decreases as well as increases in customer spending do not immediately affect our revenues in a significant way.

The semiconductor industry has experienced modest growth to date in 2011 and continued modest growth is currently anticipated for 2012. Our semiconductor customers remain cautious and focused on their costs due to the cyclical nature of the industry, the increasing complexity of product development and macroeconomic factors. The continued instability of global markets may intensify an already challenging environment for our customers to plan investment in research and development.

Nevertheless, our business outlook is positive based on growth forecasts for the semiconductor industry and our strong financials, diligent expense management, and acquisition strategy. Through our recent acquisitions, we have enhanced our technology and expanded our product portfolio and our total addressable market, especially in IP and system-level solutions, which we believe will help drive revenue growth. We expect to explore both organic and inorganic growth opportunities, including acquiring companies or technology that can contribute to the strategic, operational and financial performance of our business. We will continue to monitor worldwide economic growth rates, the considerable volatility of current global markets and other macroeconomic factors and may make adjustments to our business in the event that the semiconductor industry is unable to maintain current spending levels for our solutions. We believe that the combination of our solid financials, leading technology and strong customer relationships will help us successfully execute our strategies.

Fiscal Year End

Our fiscal year ends on the Saturday nearest October 31. Fiscal 2011 ended on October 29, 2011, fiscal 2010 ended on October 30, 2010 and fiscal 2009 ended on October 31, 2009. For presentation purposes in this Form 10-K, we refer to October 31 as the end of a fiscal year. Fiscal 2011, fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009 were 52-week fiscal years. Fiscal 2012 will be a 53-week fiscal year, which will impact our revenue, expenses and operating results.

Fiscal 2011 Financial Performance Summary

We continued to derive more than 90% of our revenue from time-based licenses, maintenance and services.

Our total revenue of $1,535.6 million increased by $154.9 million, or 11%, from $1,380.7 million in fiscal 2010. The increase was attributable to our overall growth, including sales of products associated with our prior-year acquisitions, which resulted in increased time-based license revenue, upfront license revenue and professional services revenue.

Our cost of revenue and operating expenses increased compared to fiscal 2010 primarily due to increases in employee-related costs driven by increased headcount and other direct costs from our prior-year acquisitions.


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Our income before provision for income taxes of $219.1 million increased by $20.4 million, or 10%, from $198.7 million in fiscal 2010 primarily due to overall growth.

In fiscal 2011, we had lower tax benefits than we had in fiscal 2010, which was the primary cause of our year-over-year total net income decline from $237.1 million in fiscal 2010 to $221.4 million in fiscal 2011.

Our net cash flow from operating activities of $440.3 million increased by $99.3 million, or 29%, from $341.0 million in fiscal 2010. This increase was primarily from increased customer collections due to our volume of contracts and the timing of billings to customers.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our discussion and analysis of our financial results under the heading "Results of Operations" below are based on our audited results of operations, which we have prepared in accordance with GAAP. In preparing these financial statements, we make assumptions, judgments and estimates that can affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and net income. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates based on historical experience and various other assumptions we believe are reasonable under the circumstances. Our actual results may differ from these estimates. For further information on our significant accounting policies, see Note 2 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

The accounting policies that most frequently require us to make assumptions, judgments and estimates, and therefore are critical to understanding our results of operations, are:

Revenue recognition;

Valuation of stock compensation;

Valuation of intangible assets; and

Income taxes.

Revenue Recognition

Software license revenue consists of fees associated with the licensing of our software. Maintenance and service revenue consists of maintenance fees associated with perpetual and term licenses and professional services fees. Hardware revenue consists of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) board-based products.

With respect to software licenses, we utilize three license types:

Technology Subscription Licenses (TSLs). TSLs are time-based licenses for a finite term, and generally provide the customer limited rights to receive, or to exchange certain quantities of licensed software for, unspecified future technology. We bundle and do not charge separately for post-contract customer support (maintenance) for the term of the license.

Term licenses. Term licenses are also for a finite term, but do not provide the customer any rights to receive, or to exchange licensed software for, unspecified future technology. Customers purchase maintenance separately for the first year and may renew annually for the balance of the term. The annual maintenance fee is typically calculated as a percentage of the net license fee.

Perpetual licenses. Perpetual licenses continue as long as the customer renews maintenance plus an additional 20 years. Perpetual licenses do not provide the customer any rights to receive, or to exchange licensed software for, unspecified future technology. Customers purchase maintenance separately for the first year and may renew annually.


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For the three software license types, we recognize revenue as follows:

TSLs. We typically recognize revenue from TSL fees (which include bundled maintenance) ratably over the term of the license period, or as customer installments become due and payable, whichever is later. Revenue attributable to TSLs is reported as "time-based license revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations.

Term licenses. We recognize revenue from term licenses in full upon shipment of the software if payment terms require the customer to pay at least 75% of the license fee and 100% of the maintenance fee within one year from shipment and all other revenue recognition criteria are met. Revenue attributable to these term licenses is reported as "upfront license revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations. For term licenses in which less than 75% of the license fee and 100% of the maintenance fee is payable within one year from shipment, we recognize revenue as customer payments become due and payable. Such revenue is reported as "time-based license revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations.

Perpetual licenses. We recognize revenue from perpetual licenses in full upon shipment of the software if payment terms require the customer to pay at least 75% of the license fee and 100% of the maintenance fee within one year from shipment and all other revenue recognition criteria are met. Revenue attributable to these perpetual licenses is reported as "upfront license revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations. For perpetual licenses in which less than 75% of the license fee and 100% of the maintenance fee is payable within one year from shipment, we recognize revenue as customer installments become due and payable. Such revenue is reported as "time-based license revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations.

We also enter into arrangements in which portions of revenue are contingent upon the occurrence of uncertain future events, for example, royalty arrangements. We refer to this revenue as "contingent revenue." Contingent revenue is recognized if and when the applicable event occurs. Such revenue is reported as "time-based revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations. Historically, these arrangements have not been material to our total revenue.

We recognize revenue from hardware sales in full upon shipment if all other revenue recognition criteria are met. Revenue attributable to these hardware sales is reported as "upfront license revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations. Hardware sales have not been material to our total revenue.

We infrequently enter into multiple-element arrangements that contain both software and non-software deliverables such as hardware. On a prospective basis beginning in the first quarter of fiscal 2011, we applied recently issued accounting guidance for revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables for these contracts. The adoption of the guidance did not have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements, is not expected to have a material effect on subsequent periods and did not affect the accounting for contracts which do not contain non-software deliverables. The recent accounting guidance addresses whether to treat individual deliverables or groups of deliverables in a multiple-element arrangement as separate units of accounting and how to allocate the arrangement consideration to the separate units of accounting. The guidance also requires that arrangement consideration be allocated to software deliverables (as a group) and to non-software deliverables (individually) based on relative standalone selling prices and provides guidance for estimating standalone selling prices for purposes of allocating arrangement consideration.

We have determined that the software and non-software deliverables in our contracts are separate units of accounting. Prior to the first quarter of fiscal 2011, all deliverables in our contracts were considered one unit of accounting unless we had vendor-specific objective evidence (VSOE) of fair value for all undelivered elements. We now allocate arrangement consideration to separate units of


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accounting based on estimated standalone selling prices (ESP) because we do not have objective evidence of standalone selling prices. We estimate the standalone selling prices of our separate units of accounting considering both market conditions and our own specific conditions. For hardware deliverables, we determine ESP using gross margin because we have consistent pricing practices and gross margins for these products. Determining the ESP for software deliverables requires significant judgment. We determine ESP for software deliverables after considering customer geographies, market demand and competition at the time of contract negotiation, gross margin objectives, existing portfolio pricing practices, contractually stated prices and prices for similar historical transactions.

Under the recent accounting guidance we recognize revenue for our separate units of accounting when all revenue recognition criteria are met. Revenue allocated to hardware units of accounting is recognized upon delivery when all other revenue recognition criteria are met. Revenue allocated to software units of accounting is recognized according to the methods described above depending on the software license type (TSL, term license or perpetual license).

We recognize revenue from maintenance fees ratably over the maintenance period to the extent cash has been received or fees become due and payable, and recognize revenue from professional services and training fees as such services are performed and accepted by the customer. Revenue attributable to maintenance, professional services and training is reported as "maintenance and service revenue" in the consolidated statements of operations.

We also enter into arrangements to deliver software products, either alone or together with other products or services that require significant modification, or customization of the software. We account for such arrangements using the percentage of completion method as we have the ability to make reasonably dependable estimates that relate to the extent of progress toward completion, contract revenues and costs. We measure the progress towards completion using the labor hours incurred to complete the project. Revenue attributable to these arrangements is reported as maintenance and service revenue in the consolidated statements of operations.

We determine the fair value of each element in multiple element software arrangements that contain only software and software related deliverables based on VSOE. We limit our assessment of VSOE of fair value for each element to the price charged when such element is sold separately. We have analyzed all of the elements included in our multiple-element software arrangements and have determined that we have sufficient VSOE to allocate revenue to the maintenance components of our perpetual and term license products and to professional services. Accordingly, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met, we recognize license revenue from perpetual and term licenses upon delivery using the residual method, recognize revenue from maintenance ratably over the maintenance term, and recognize revenue from professional services as services are performed and accepted by the customer. We recognize revenue from TSLs ratably over the term of the license, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met, since there is not sufficient VSOE to allocate the TSL fee between license and maintenance services.

We make significant judgments related to revenue recognition. Specifically, in connection with each transaction involving our products, we must evaluate whether: (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (2) delivery of software or services has occurred, (3) the fee for such software or services is fixed or determinable, and (4) collectability of the full license or service fee is probable. All four of these criteria must be met in order for us to recognize revenue with respect to a particular arrangement. We apply these revenue recognition criteria as follows:

Persuasive Evidence of an Arrangement Exists. Prior to recognizing revenue on an arrangement, our customary policy is to have a written contract, signed by both the customer and by us or a purchase order from those customers that have previously negotiated a standard end-user license arrangement or purchase agreement.


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Delivery Has Occurred. We deliver our products to our customers electronically or physically. For electronic deliveries, delivery occurs when we provide access to our customers to take immediate possession of the software through downloading it to the customer's hardware. For physical deliveries, the standard transfer terms are typically FOB shipping point. We generally ship our products or license keys promptly after acceptance of customer orders. However, a number of factors can affect the timing of product shipments and, as a result, timing of revenue recognition, including the delivery dates requested by customers and our operational capacity to fulfill product orders at the end of a fiscal quarter.

The Fee is Fixed or Determinable. Our determination that an arrangement fee is fixed or determinable depends principally on the arrangement's payment terms. Our standard payment terms for perpetual and term licenses require 75% or more of the license fee and 100% of the maintenance fee to be paid within one year. If the arrangement includes these terms, we regard the fee as fixed or determinable, and recognize all license revenue under the arrangement in full upon delivery (assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met). If the arrangement does not include these terms, we do not consider the fee to be fixed or determinable and generally recognize revenue when customer installments are due and payable. In the case of a TSL, because of the right to exchange products or receive unspecified future technology and because VSOE for maintenance services does not exist for a TSL, we recognize revenue ratably over the term of the license, but not in advance of when customers' installments become due and payable.

Collectability is Probable. We judge collectability of the arrangement fees on a customer-by-customer basis pursuant to our credit review policy. We typically sell to customers with whom we have a history of successful collection. For a new customer, or when an existing customer substantially expands its commitments, we evaluate the customer's financial position and ability to pay and typically assign a credit limit based on that review. We increase the credit limit only after we have established a successful collection history with the customer. If we determine at any time that collectability is not probable under a particular arrangement based upon our credit review process or the customer's payment history, we recognize revenue under that arrangement as customer payments are actually received.

Valuation of Stock Compensation

Stock compensation expense is measured on the grant date based on the fair value of the award and is recognized as expense over the vesting period in accordance with ASC 718, Stock Compensation. We use the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to determine the fair value of stock options and employee stock purchase plan awards. The Black-Scholes option-pricing model incorporates various subjective assumptions including expected volatility, expected term and risk-free interest rates. We estimate the expected volatility by a combination of implied volatility for publicly traded options of our stock with a term of six months or longer and the historical stock price volatility over the estimated expected term of our stock awards. We determine the expected term of our stock awards based on historical experience. In addition, judgment is required in estimating the forfeiture rate on stock awards. We calculate the expected forfeiture rate based on average historical trends. These input factors are subjective and are determined using management's judgment. If a difference arises between the assumptions used in determining stock compensation cost and the actual factors which become known over time, we may change the input factors used in determining future stock compensation costs. Any such changes could materially impact our results of operations in the period in which the changes are made and in periods thereafter.

Valuation of Intangible Assets

We evaluate our intangible assets for indications of impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. Intangible assets consist of


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purchased technology, contract rights intangibles, customer-relationships, trademarks and trade names, covenants not to compete, capitalized software development and other intangibles. Factors that could trigger an impairment review include significant under-performance relative to expected historical or projected future operating results, significant changes in the manner of our use of the acquired assets or the strategy for our overall business or significant negative industry or economic trends. If this evaluation indicates that the value of the intangible asset may be impaired, we make an assessment of the recoverability of the net carrying value of the asset over its remaining useful life. If this assessment indicates that the intangible asset is not recoverable, based on the estimated undiscounted future cash flows of the technology over the remaining useful life, we reduce the net carrying value of the related intangible asset to fair value. Any such impairment charge could be significant and could have a material adverse effect on our reported financial results. We did not record any impairment charges on our intangible assets during fiscal 2011, 2010 or 2009.

Income Taxes

Our tax provisions are calculated using estimates in accordance with ASC 740, Income Taxes. Our estimates and assumptions may differ from the actual results as reflected in our income tax returns and we record the required adjustments when they are identified or resolved.

We recognize deferred tax assets and liabilities for the temporary differences between the book and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which we expect the differences to reverse, and for tax loss and credit carryovers. We record a valuation allowance to reduce the deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. In evaluating our ability to utilize our deferred tax assets, we consider all available positive and negative evidence, including our past operating results, our forecast of future taxable income on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction basis, as well as feasible and prudent tax planning strategies. These assumptions require significant judgment about the forecasts of future taxable income and are consistent with the plans and estimates we are using to manage the underlying businesses. We believe that the net deferred tax assets of approximately $338.8 million that are recorded on our balance sheet as of October 31, 2011 will ultimately be realized. However, if we determine in the future that it is more likely than not we will not be able to realize a portion or the full amount of deferred tax assets, we would record an adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance as a charge to earnings in the period such determination is made.

We apply a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring uncertain tax positions. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining whether it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount which is more than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement.

The calculation of tax liabilities involves the inherent uncertainty associated with the application of complex tax laws. We are also subject to examination by various taxing authorities. We believe we have adequately provided in our financial statements for potential additional taxes. If we ultimately determine that these amounts are not owed, we would reverse the liability and recognize the tax benefit in the period in which we determine that the liability is no longer necessary. If an ultimate tax assessment exceeds our estimate of tax liabilities, we would record an additional charge to earnings.

Results of Operations

Revenue Background

We generate our revenue from the sale of software licenses, maintenance and professional services and to a small extent, hardware products. Under current accounting rules and policies, we recognize revenue from orders we receive for software licenses, services and hardware products at varying times. In most instances, we recognize revenue on a TSL software license order over the


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license term and on a term or perpetual software license order in the quarter in which the license is delivered. Substantially all of our current time-based licenses are TSLs with an average license term of approximately three years. Revenue on contracts requiring significant modification or development is accounted for using the percentage of completion method over the period of the development. Revenue on hardware product orders is generally recognized in full at the time the product is shipped. Contingent revenue is recognized if and when the applicable event occurs.

Revenue on maintenance orders is recognized ratably over the maintenance period (normally one year). Revenue on professional services orders is generally recognized after services are performed and accepted by the customer.

Our revenue in any fiscal quarter is equal to the sum of our time-based license, upfront license, maintenance and professional services and hardware revenue for the period. We derive time-based license revenue in any quarter largely from TSL orders received and delivered in prior quarters and to a smaller extent due to contracts in which revenue is recognized as customer installments become due and payable and from contingent revenue arrangements. We derive upfront license revenue directly from term and perpetual license and hardware product orders mostly booked and shipped during the quarter. We derive maintenance revenue in any quarter largely from maintenance orders received in prior quarters since our maintenance orders generally yield revenue ratably over a term of one year. We . . .

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